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Future Exhibitions

(Exhibition descriptions, dates and titles are subject to change)

 
Creation and Erasure:
Art of the Bingham Canyon Mine

May 30–September 28, 2014

Northern Utah’s Bingham Canyon Mine, the largest man-made excavation on earth, has been a source of fascination and inspiration for artists around the country since the mine’s earliest days. Spanning 1873 to the present, this exhibition presents paintings, drawings, prints, and photographs that examine the mine from a variety of perspectives, tracing its physical development as well as its effects on the local economy, culture, environment, and people. Featured artists include Jonas Lie, William Rittase, Andreas Feininger, Jean Arnold, Edward Burtynsky, Robert Smithson, and the Center for Land Use Interpretation, among others. The exhibition also includes photographs of the mine after the massive landslide of spring 2013, the effects of which continue to impact both the mine’s operations and the local economy.

PRESENTING SPONSOR:

SUPPORTING SPONSORS:
S. J. and Jessie E.Quinney Foundation | Ray, Quinney & Nebeker Foundation

 

Moksha: Photography by Fazal Sheikh

July 11–November 30, 2014

Moksha: Photography by Fazal Sheikh weaves together the artist-activist's portraits and the stories of a community of widows in the Hindu pilgrimage site of Vrindavan. A marginalized segment of Hindu society since ancient times, widows, many of them dispossessed of home and family, have few places of sanctuary. In Vrindavan, a city holy to the Hindu god Krishna, these women chant and pray every day in the hopes of obtaining moksha, release from the constant cycle of death and rebirth. The exhibition, comprising forty photographs by Sheikh, is on loan from the Princeton Museum of Art. Fazal Sheikh has worked as a photographer since graduating from Princeton University in 1987. Primarily through portraits, he brings attention to marginalized peoples and groups around the world. His other projects include Ladli, A Camel for the Son, and Ramadan Moon. He has won numerous awards including the Henri Cartier-Bresson International Grand Prize and a MacArthur Fellowship.

 

Krishna: Lord of Vrindavan

August 8-November 20, 2014

A companion exhibition to Moksha: Photography by Fazal Sheikh, Krishna: Lord of Vrindavan explores the Hindu god Krishna through sacred and secular artworks, dating from the 11th century to the 20th, from the Museum's Asian art collection. Krishna promised followers that through bhakti (devotion) to him, one could gain moksha (salvation). The exhibition will be presented in the Museum's Emma Eccles Jones Education Gallery.

 

salt 10: Conrad Bakker

Opens September 12, 2014

Conrad Bakker makes imprecise, to-scale replicas of objects like books, photographs, chairs, and motorcycles out of wood and paint to investigate the creation of value and economic systems. Often inserting his handmade facsimiles into the commercial realms of their real commodity counterparts, Bakker circumvents the art market, challenges postmodern perceptions of authorship and authenticity, and questions the distinction between originality and appropriation.

 

Tony Feher

Opens September 26, 2014

American sculptor Tony Feher has been changing the way we see the world for the past three decades. With a hyper-awareness of the formal qualities of everyday objects-bottles, tape, plastic bags-Feher turns unconsidered, often-discarded materials into poetic sculptures and elegant installations. For this exhibition, the UMFA has invited Feher to help us re-imagine the architecture of our Great Hall with a brand new site-specific installation.

 

The Faculty Show
October 24, 2014-January 11, 2015

This triennial exhibition showcases the newest work by the University of Utah's Department of Art and Design faculty and celebrates the working artists who inspire the community through their creative output and their teaching.

 

(con)text

December 12, 2014-July 26, 2015

The presence of text in art has greatly increased in the modern era, but the relationship of language and visual art have a much longer history. (con)text examines this history as represented in the UMFA's permanent collection. From an ancient Egyptian wall relief to medieval illuminated manuscripts to the contemporary practices of John Cage, Bruce Nauman, and Willie Cole, this exhibition looks at the way visual artists have harnessed the power of language to document, to inspire, to inform, and to persuade. (con)text also explores how language itself constantly evolves, leading to both the loss and creation of meaning.

 

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art
from the Smithsonian American Art Museum

February 6-May 17, 2015

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-twentieth century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum's pioneering collection of Latino art. It explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture.

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art is organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Generous support for the exhibition has been provided by Altria Group, the Honorable Aida M. Alvarez; Judah Best, The James F. Dicke Family Endowment, Sheila Duignan and Mike Wilkins, Tania and Tom Evans, Friends of the National Museum of the American Latino, The Michael A. and the Honorable Marilyn Logsdon Mennello Endowment, Henry R. Muñoz III, Wells Fargo and Zions Bank. Additional significant support was provided by The Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. Support for Treasures to Go, the museum's traveling exhibition program, comes from The C.F. Foundation, Atlanta.

 

 








 


              
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