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07/16/12 Eddie Miller, Jr. Lakester Speeds into UMFA Exhibition

05/31/12 Speed: The Art of the Performance Automobile

04/19/12 Low Lives 4

03/19/12 salt 5 Highlights Utah-based Artist

02/03/12 The Faculty Show: Recent Works by the University of Utah Art Faculty

01/27/12 At Work: Prints from the Great Depression

01/20/12 Georges Rouault: Circus of the Shooting Star

11/03/11 salt 4: Xaviera Simmons

09/20/11 David Burnett – Too Close

09/08/11 Color

07/27/11 Final Light: V. Douglas Snow in Retrospect

07/21/11 LeConte Stewart: One Artist. Two Exhibitions. Over 200 Works.

 

Eddie Miller, Jr. Lakester
Speeds into UMFA Exhibition

 

Jim Miller photo

 

July 16, Salt Lake City - The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) at the University of Utah is pleased to announce the addition of the 1950 Eddie Miller, Jr. Lakester to the special exhibition, Speed: The Art of the Performance Automobile, on view through September 16. The Lakester will be on view to the public at the UMFA beginning Tuesday, July 17. It will replace the 1935 Duesenberg SJ "Mormon Meteor I" as the meteor prepares for the prestigious Glenmoor Gathering of Significant Automobiles event this fall.

 

"We are thrilled to bring the Eddie Miller Lakester to the UMFA," says Gretchen Dietrich, executive director of the UMFA. "It was incredible to have the ‘Mormon Meteor I' in our galleries, and we are equally excited about sharing the historic Eddie Miller racer with our car-loving and art-loving community. It gives previous Speed visitors a great reason to come back."

 

The award-winning Lakester's sleek design was originally sketched by Eddie Miller, Sr. in the mid-1930s as a challenge to Ab Jenkins' "Mormon Meteor I" racer. While Miller never built the car, his dream was realized by his son Eddie Miller, Jr. in 1950. A gifted mechanic, Eddie Miller, Jr. spent three years creating the bronze Lakester from various recycled car parts. He handmade a tubular steel chassis, drilled it for lightness, and wrapped it in a sleek aluminum body of his own design.

 

The Eddie Miller, Jr. Lakester raced for the first time on the dry lakes of Los Angeles in 1950 and turned an impressive 139 mph, landing it in the August issue of Hot Rod Magazine that year. Two years later at Bonneville the Lakester reached 156.58 mph for a solid fourth-place finish in its class.

 

After a series of ownership changes, Don Ferguson, Sr. purchased the Miller Lakester. The legendary Bonneville racecar was restored in 2010 by his son Don Ferguson, Jr. and won first place in the Historic Hot Rod class at the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance.

 

"Eddie Miller, Jr.'s Lakester exemplifies the skill and talent of post-World War II hot rodders," says Ken Gross, guest curator of the Speed exhibition. "The highly advanced Lakester received nationwide attention, and ultimately influenced Pontiac Division of General Motors to make the famed Pontiac Bonneville, which became one of America's best-known performance cars."

 

The 1935 Duesenberg SJ "Mormon Meteor I" will leave Speed: The Art of the Performance Automobile in preparation for the Glenmoor Gathering of Significant Automobiles, a major automotive event held near Canton, Ohio in mid September (www.glenmoorgathering.com). Ab Jenkins' famous 1938 "Mormon Meteor III" will remain on display in the Speed exhibition.

 

About Speed: The Art of the Performance Automobile

The UMFA's special exhibition, Speed: The Art of the Performance Automobile, features 19 of theworld's fastest and finest automobiles. Organized by Ken Gross, the exhibition is on view through September 16, 2012 and features a century of legends on wheels. The cars exemplify premier aerodynamics, engineering, and design of their era, ranging from Steve McQueen's 1957 Jaguar XKSS Roadster to the 1938 "Mormon Meteor III"-the famous Bonneville racer that holds more long distance speed records than any other automobile in history. Tickets are sold in time slots, and are $18 for adults, $13 for youth (ages 14-17) and seniors (ages 65+), $3 for children (ages 3-13), and free for infants (0-2). General admission included. Information available at www.speedumfa.com.

 

About the UMFA

As Utah's official state art museum, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) has long served as a bridge from the University of Utah campus to the broader community. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in making meaningful connections with the world of art. The museum's permanent collection spans more than 5,000 years of human creativity and features over 18,000 works from around the globe. Special exhibitions make each visit a new experience, and a variety of public programs are scheduled year-round to encourage dialogue and discovery. The UMFA is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. Museum hours are Tuesday-Friday: 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Wednesdays: 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Weekends: 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. Info at (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

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Speed: The Art of the Performance Automobile

June 2 - September 16, 2012


May 31, 2012, Salt Lake City - Racing into town this summer, Speed: The Art of the Performance Automobile will be on display at the University of Utah on the first-floor galleries of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building from June 2- September 16. The exhibition comprises 19 of the world's finest automobiles and was organized by automotive historian, museum consultant and guest curator Ken Gross.

 

Speed will showcase a century of automobiles that exemplify premier aerodynamics, engineering, art and design of their eras. The cars range from the menacing 1952 "Beast III" Bonneville racer (pictured above) to the ultra-cool 1957 Jaguar XK-SS Roadster, once owned by Steve McQueen. The cars are on loan from some of the country's top automobile collections, including the Price Museum of Speed; National Automobile Museum; Petersen Automotive Museum; Bruce Meyer; Peter and Merle Mullin; Jon and Mary Shirley; and the Larry H. Miller Family.

 

"We are delighted to be presenting Speed: The Art of the Performing Automobile and are confident that our visitors will be amazed at the beauty, engineering, and amazing stories of these incredible cars," says Gretchen Dietrich, executive director of the UMFA. "We hope many first-time visitors will come to see the exhibition and be introduced to our wonderful museum and collection."

 

A number of art museums in America and Europe recently presented popular exhibitions of cars, including Curves of Steel at the Phoenix Art Museum (2007), Allure of the Automobile at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta (2010) and the Portland Art Museum (2011), as well as and L'Art de L'Automobile: Chef d'Oeuvres de la Collection Ralph Lauren at the Les Arts Décoratifs in Paris (2011). The first art exhibition of cars was Eight Automobiles, mounted sixty years ago at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City (1951).

 

The UMFA's automobile exhibition, however, is the first of its kind. Speed will examine automobiles not only as works of art and design, but as objects of rich racing history. The featured cars were created by legendary engineers, distinguished designers, and storied automobile companies; many are speed record-setters that were owned and raced by famous drivers and other notable people of their time. This is the first and only time these 19 cars have been seen together in one venue.

 

Many of the cars in Speed: The Art of the Performance Automobile have a special connection to Utah's famed Bonneville Salt Flats, where racers from all over the world traveled, and continue to travel, in attempts to break land speed records.

 

The "Mormon Meteor III" is perhaps the most famous Bonneville racecar. Designed and driven by legendary racer and former Salt Lake City Mayor David Abbott "Ab" Jenkins (1883-1956), the "Mormon Meteor III" set more long distance land speed records than any other automobile in history, and it still holds 12 of them today.

 

Speed: The Art of the Performance Automobile is a special ticketed exhibition and museum visits are organized in time slots. Tickets are available for purchase through Smithstix at www.smithstix.com.

 

• Adults (18-64): $18
• Youth (14-17), seniors (65+), and University of Utah faculty and staff: $13
• University of Utah students: $9
• Children (3-13): $3
• Infants (0-2): Free
• UMFA members: Complimentary admission based on level of membership

 

A variety of public programming has been scheduled to enhance the museum visitor's experience, including a free lecture series, a free film series co-presented by the Utah Film Center, auto-inspired seminars and more. The UMFA will also present Photo Finish, a companion exhibition of photographs from the museum's collection, in the last gallery of Speed: The Art of the Performance Automobile.

 

"These 19 special automobiles comprise a remarkable selection of historic racers and high-performance cars, spanning more than a century," notes guest curator Ken Gross. "Unlikely to be repeated, this exhibition represents a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see and study these legends on wheels."

 

The UMFA thanks the John and Marcia Price Family Foundation for generously serving as the title sponsor of Speed: The Art of the Performance Automobile. The UMFA also thanks additional sponsors and partners, including the George S. and Dolores Dore Eccles Foundation, Zions Bank, the Stephen G. & Susan E. Denkers Family Foundation, Stephen E. Denkers, Lynn and Tom Fey, Larry H. Miller Group, Mary and Tom McCarthey, Merit Medical, Kathie and Mark Miller, Shari and David Quinney, Diane and Sam Stewart, Susan and Jim Swartz, Naoma Tate, University of Utah College of Fine Arts, Marva and John Warnock, Toni and John Bloomberg, Sue and Al Landon, Kurt B. Larsen and Tyrene Christopolus, Elyce and Bill Mouskondis, Sue and David Razor, Bob Rose, Wells Fargo Bank, Lisa and William Wirthlin, the Price Museum of Speed, U & the Arts Program, Richter7, Xfinity, and Claudia Skaggs Luttrell. A full list is available at speedumfa.com.

 

For more information please visit: www.speedumfa.com.

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in making meaningful connections with the world of art. Museum hours are Tue- Fri: 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Wed 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat & Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. Info at (801) 581-7332 or www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

 

Low Lives 4

April 27 and 28, 2012

PRESS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:
--Jorge Rojas, Low Lives Founding Director, keoqui@gmail.com, 917.757.7626
--Shelbey Lang, UMFA PR & Marketing Associate, shelbey.lang@umfa.utah.edu, 801.585.1306

 

Low Lives 4: Networked Performance Festival
UMFA the Global Presenting Venue of International Art Event
Michelle Ellsworth, 2011 USA Knight Fellow, to be the featured performance artist in Utah
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Salt Lake City, UT - The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) at the University of Utah is pleased to announce its participation as the global presenting venue for Low Lives 4. This two-day festival features more than 50 live performance-based artworks from around the world, which are transmitted over the web and projected in real-time to 25 international venues.

The UMFA will host Low Lives curator, Jorge Rojas, in the G. W. Anderson Family Great Hall as he conducts the event on Friday, April 27 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. and Saturday, April 28 from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. Contemporary artist Michelle Ellsworth, recipient of the 2011 USA Knight Fellow award, will perform two live "performance sculptures" from her Please Consider series at the UMFA on Friday at 9:00 p.m. and Saturday at 3:30 p.m. More than 50 additional performances by international artists will be streamed online and projected onto a screen at the UMFA.

Low Lives 4 is open to the public and free with general UMFA admission.

About Low Lives
Founded in 2009 by artist and independent curator Jorge Rojas, the annual Low Lives festival highlights works that critically investigate, challenge, and extend the potential of networked performance practices. The project celebrates the transmission of ideas beyond geographical and cultural borders, offering global audiences the opportunity to consider live performance in both physical and virtual space.

Low Lives provides a new model for efficiently presenting, viewing, and archiving live performance-based art. The annual exhibition embraces low-tech aesthetics, such as low pixel images and muddled sound quality, to emphasize the raw and inquisitive quality of the broadcast and reception of the works.

Low Lives has found new momentum after presenting Low Lives: Occupy! in New York City on March 3, 2012. Low Lives partnered with Occupy with Art and The Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics at NYU to present a one-night-only event of simulcast performances by 36 artists and collectives committed to the Occupy Wall Street movement. The well-received Low Lives Occupy! program offered new perspectives on the Occupy protests and expanded the reach of the movement by broadcasting to an international community.

"Over the past four years Low Lives has developed a platform that invites and enables artists, audiences, and presenting venues to ‘plug in and participate' from anywhere an internet connection exists," Rojas explains. "Low Lives is not simply about the presentation of performative gestures at a particular place and time, it is also about exploring the potential of live streaming networks as a creative medium connecting performance artists with audiences around the world."

Low Lives 4 is co-produced by the Brooklyn-based arts organizations Chez Bushwick (www.chezbushwick.net) and SPREAD ART (www.spreadart.org), and by Colombian artist, Juan Obando (www.juanobando.com).

A live simulcast of the event will be streamed on April 27 and 28 at www.lowlives.net.

2012 Participating Artists
Austin Adkins | Regina Agu | Lindsey Allgood + Amy Luznicky | Emma Alonze | Mauricio Ancalmo | Angela Bartram + Mary O'Neill | Mariane Bourcheix-Laporte | Ruth Vigueras Bravo | Caryana Castillo | Khalil Charif | Matthew Thomas Cianfrani | Gina Cuntstruct | Elwin Cotman | Dance Troupe Practice + Luciana D'Anunciação | Ian Deleon + Kara Stokowski | Stephanie Diamond | Bados Earthling + The Wild Audio Society | Michelle Ellsworth | Ursula Endlicher | Tim Eriksen | Francesca Fini | Les Filles Föllen | Marcel William Foster + Dunstan Matungwa | Future Death Toll | Lawrence Graham-Brown | Alejandro Guzmán | Matt Hawthorn | Joseph Herring | Kanene Holder | James Holland + Alycia Bright Holland | Linda Hutchins | Rima Najdi | Samantha Jones | Igor Josifov | Nathaniel Katz + Valentina Curandi | Elizabeth Leister | Jonathan Lemieux | Gideonsson/Londré | Jonatan Lopez | Tina Mariane Krogh Madsen | Soukei Matsuo | MoTA - Museum of Transitory Art | Nataliya Petkova | Blatta Orientalis | Alexandre Pombo-Mendes | prOphecy sun | Stefan Riebel | Tara Raye Russo | Nuria Guiu Sagarra | Maximiliano Siñani | Jonathan Sutton | Étienne Tremblay-Tardif | Elinor Thompson | Robert Tyree + Andra Rotaru | Marcus Vinícius | A.G. Viva | Alyssa Taylor Wendt | Amelia Winger-Bearskin | Martin Zet

2012 Presenting Partners
Aljira, A Center for Contemporary Art (Newark, New Jersey); Center for Performance Research (CPR) (Brooklyn, New York); Chez Bushwick (Brooklyn, New York); Co-Lab (Austin, Texas); Diaspora Vibe Gallery (Miami, Florida); Fusebox Festival (Austin, Texas); Grace Exhibition Space (Brooklyn, New York); Legion Arts (Cedar Rapids, Iowa); Little Berlin (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania); Living Arts (Tulsa, Oklahoma); Mascher Space Co-op (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania); Portland Institute for Contemporary Art (PICA) (Portland, Oregon); Real Art Ways (Harford, Connecticut); SOMArts (San Francisco, California); Space One Eleven (Birmingham, Alabama): Spread Art (Brooklyn, New York); Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) (Salt Lake City, Utah); Alice Yard (Port of Spain, Trinidad & Tobago); the temporary space (USA/Japan); Yamaguchi Institute of Contemporary Arts (YICA) (Yamaguchi, Japan); Dimanche Rouge (Paris, France); La Maison des Artistes (Paris, France); Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Bogotá (MAC) (Colombia); At The Vanishing Point (Sydney, Australia); Small Projects (Tromsø, Norway); Ateliers '89 (Aruba)

About Jorge Rojas
Jorge Rojas is a multidisciplinary artist and curator. He uses traditional and new media, as well as performative elements to investigate communication systems and the effect of technology on artistic production, social structures and communities. Rojas' work and curatorial projects have been exhibited internationally. In 2009, Rojas founded Low Lives, where he currently serves as director, producer, and curator.

About Michelle Ellsworth
Born in Washington DC and raised in Palo Alto, CA, Michelle Ellsworth makes solo performance work, performable websites, drawings, and videos. She was awarded the USA Artists Knight Fellowship for 2011. She has performed at On The Boards, DiverseWorks, Dance Theater Workshop, Jacob's Pillow, and Brown University. Her drawings, spreadsheets, and scripts have been published in CHAIN and her screen dances have been seen around Europe and throughout the U.S. Ellsworth is currently working on a 7-inch recording with drummer Sean Meehan. She attended BYU for several years and is the great-great-great-granddaughter of Edmund Lovell Ellsworth, the first hand-cart captain to cross the plains. More information can be found at www.michelleellsworth.com.

About the Utah Museum of Fine Arts
The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. As Utah's premier visual arts resource, the UMFA inspires visitors of all ages to discover meaningful connections with the world of art. The UMFA's permanent collection features some 18,000 works, and special exhibitions make each visit a new experience. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, free for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission is offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks fund. Museum hours are Tuesday-Friday: 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu. The Utah Museum of Fine Arts was also the Low Lives global presenting venue in 2011.

For more information, please visit www.lowlives.net.


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salt 5: Daniel Everett

March 30-July 29, 2012

 

Contacts:
--Shelbey Lang, UMFA Public Relations and Marketing Associate, shelbey.lang@umfa.utah.edu, 801-585-1306
--Jill Dawsey, Associate Curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, jdawsey@mcasd.org

 

salt 5: Daniel Everett
March 30-July 29, 2012

Utah-based artist highlighted in series of global contemporary art
FREE conversation with the artist on opening night

 


Salt Lake City, UT - The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) at the University of Utah is pleased to present salt 5: Daniel Everett, the fifth project in the Museum's series of exhibitions showcasing innovative contemporary art from around the world.

 

salt 5: Daniel Everett is organized by Jill Dawsey, associate curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and former chief curator at the UMFA. The fifth salt installation opens on March 30 and will remain on view through July 29, 2012 in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at the University of Utah. The exhibition will be located in the salt gallery on the UMFA's second floor.

 

Working in a range of mediums, artist and Utah resident Daniel Everett investigates the ways in which the built environment shapes our experience as individuals. His work explores ideas relating to architecture, virtual and physical space, modes of vision and surveillance, and the legacy of modernism. salt 5: Daniel Everett includes several photographic prints, two video pieces, and new mixed-media installations.


A highlight of salt 5: Daniel Everett is the artist's photographic works, which often feature what curator Jill Dawsey calls "anonymous architecture": generic buildings and structures that serve as spaces of transience. In his Monument series, Everett places images of standard security booths against gradient pink, blue, or green backgrounds, leaving them to float freely and detached from their original context. By referring to these minimal, mass-produced structures as "monuments," Everett may suggest that they serve a commemorative function, perhaps paying homage to modernist architecture of the past. Yet the buildings also serve an authoritative purpose of security and surveillance, complicating their perceived banality. Like much of Everett's work, the Monuments are both inviting and unnerving.


"The salt series is designed to bring the best of global contemporary art to Utah, and we are delighted to feature a Utah-based artist who is creating work as compelling and challenging as art found anywhere else," says Dawsey. "Everett's work is rigorous, formally inventive, and frequently humorous. He uses technologies of his own time and takes inspiration from the contemporary landscape, which is what great artists have always done."

 

Daniel Everett received a BFA in photography from Brigham Young University in 2006 and a MFA in photography from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2009. Everett has had solo exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and the NEXT Art Fair, Chicago, and his work has been included in group exhibitions at Spencer Brownstone Gallery, PPOW Gallery, and Allegra LaViola Gallery in New York; 12 Mail Gallery, Paris; XL Art Space, Helsinki; and the Central Utah Art Center, Ephraim, Utah. His work has been featured in Index Magazine, Proximity, and Carousel Magazine. Everett is an Assistant Professor of Visual Arts at Brigham Young University.

 

The UMFA's salt series affirms the Museum's commitment to the art of today and tomorrow, demonstrating that contemporary art is vital, dynamic and socially relevant.

 

Programming
Visiting Artist Talk: A Conversation with Daniel Everett
7 p.m. on Friday, March 30, 2012
Join former UMFA chief curator Jill Dawsey for a conversation with salt 5 artist, Daniel Everett. Don't miss your chance to learn about Evertt's artistic practice in this free public program on opening night.

 


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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks fund. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu .

 

The Faculty Show

February 17-May 6, 2012

 

Contacts:
- Shelbey Lang, UMFA Public Relations Associate, 801.585.1306, shelbey.lang@umfa.utah.edu
- Deb Banerjee, Guest Curator, Deborah.banerjee@usu.edu


The Faculty Show
Recent Work by the University of Utah Art Faculty
February 17-May 6, 2012

Informal monthly gallery talks will provide insight into featured artists' work

 

Salt Lake City, UT- The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) has long served as the primary visual arts resource at the University of Utah and in the broader community. As part of the museum's ongoing collaboration with campus entities, the UMFA is pleased to present The Faculty Show, an exhibition of artwork by the acclaimed faculty of the University of Utah Department of Art and Art History.

 

On view in the UMFA's Great Hall and first-floor galleries from February 17 to May 6, 2012, The Faculty Show will boast over 70 new works from dozens of tenured, tenure-track and adjunct faculty artists. The exhibition reflects current trends in contemporary art as well as traditional practices in a variety of media including ceramics, printmaking, painting, photography, sculpture, digital imaging, video and new media. The Faculty Show was organized by guest curator Deb Banerjee, who currently serves as curator of exhibitions and programs at the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum at Utah State University.

 

"The works on display in The Faculty Show allow us to step back and survey the leading edge of contemporary art practices," says Banerjee. "In keeping with the art of today, the exhibition allows for a diversity of media and thought."

 

"We are so pleased to present the work of this outstanding group of artists," explains Jenny Woods, UMFA campus outreach coordinator. "As educators, these faculty members mentor and cultivate new generations of artists. As working artists, they enrich our lives with engaging, high caliber work. It's a treat for the UMFA to celebrate both of the vital roles they play."

 

Featured artists, listed in alphabetical order, include: Zuzanna Audette, Edward Bateman, Sandy Bruvnard, Larel Caryn, Van Chu, Lewis J. Crawford, Al Denyer, John Erickson, Thomas S. Hoffman, Holly K. Johnson, Lenka Konopasek, Kristina Lenzi, Beth Krensky, Jimmy Lucero, Joe Marotta, V. Kim Martinez, Ray Morales, Martin Novak, Maureen O'Hara Ure, John O'Connell, Sylvia Ramachandran Skeen, Brian Snapp, Carol Sogard, Jared Steffensen, Paul Stout, Emily Tipps, and Maryann Webster.

 

The Faculty Show honors the rich legacy of visual arts at the University of Utah. The featured artists are successors to the many eminent teachers who contributed to the development of the program since its founding in 1888, including notable artists such as Lee Green Richards, Alvin Gittins, LeConte Stewart and James Taylor Harwood. Today, faculty members in the University of Utah Department of Art and Art History are instrumental in cultivating generations of creative minds and contributing to the dynamic visual culture in Utah.

 

A series of three informal gallery talks will take place throughout the run of The Faculty Show exhibition. Free with general museum admission, the programs will take place at 12:00 p.m. on February 24, 6:00 p.m. on March 21, and 3:00 p.m. on April 24. The gallery talks will provide museum visitors the opportunity to meet some of the featured artists and gain insight into their work.


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As Utah's official state art museum, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) at the University of Utah is the primary cultural resource for global visual arts and culture in the region. The UMFA has long served as a bridge from the University of Utah campus to the broader community, working to engage visitors in making meaningful connections with the world of art. The Museum's permanent collection spans more than 5,000 years of human creativity and features over 18,000 works of art. An ambitious special exhibition program and a variety of educational events are scheduled year-round to foster dialogue and discovery. The UMFA is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive on the campus of the University of Utah. General admission is $7 for adults, $5 for youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty and children under 6 years of age. For more information, call 801 581 7332, visit www.umfa.utah.edu, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

 

At Work: Prints from the Great Depression

February 10-May 6, 2012


CONTACTS:
--Shelbey Lang, UMFA Public Relations Associate, 801-585-1306, shelbey.lang@umfa.utah.edu
--Donna Poulton, UMFA Curator of the Art of Utah and the West, 801-585-6815, donna.poulton@umfa.utah.edu
--Matthew Basso, American West Center Director, 801-585-6847, matt.basso@utah.edu


AT WORK
Prints from the Great Depression
February 10 - May 6, 2012


Salt Lake City, UT - The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) and the American West Center (AWC) at the University of Utah are pleased to present At Work: Prints from the Great Depression, an exhibition exploring the role of work and art during one of America's most trying eras. At Work prompts contemporary questions about the place of labor in our lives today, a theme that is further explored through a series of companion programs and projects.

 

The At Work exhibition was organized through the collaborative efforts of AWC director Matthew Basso, University of Utah Department of History graduate student Emily Johnson, and UMFA curator Donna Poulton. At Work will be on view at the UMFA from February 10 to May 6, 2012.

 

"Remembered as one of the most devastating periods in the history of the United States, unemployment and the Great Depression are linked in people's minds for good reason," says Dr. Basso. "At its height, the Depression left more than 20 percent of Americans out of work, and iconic images of Dust Bowl migrants and soup kitchens dominate our picture of 1930s America. But as the exhibition At Work reveals, Depression-era artists were equally interested in depicting people at work."

 

At Work features more than 60 prints by Thomas Hart Benton, Herschel Levit, Claire Mahl and dozens of other printmakers, many of whom were among the 5,000 visual artists employed by the federal government in the 1930s. Their prints provide a complex portrait of the place of work in the social politics of the era. They illustrate, for example, that many white-collar workers were forced to take blue-collar jobs after the collapse, and that government programs designed to support family breadwinners often left women with limited opportunity for paid work.

 

Printmaking became a particularly popular artistic mode of expression for Depression-era artists. Inherently democratic, the medium enabled printmakers to easily create and cheaply distribute copies of their work. Many artists celebrated the working class through their prints, creating dignified images of farmers, railroad workers, seamstresses, and street vendors.

 

At Work features some similarly heroic images of the working class, with prints depicting muscular men building dams, drilling oil or working in factories. The exhibition draws parallels between the hard labor of these men and images of women working at home, serving as seamstresses or cooking meals. A less heroic portrait of the working class is also present in At Work, as some artists portrayed hardened, stoop-shouldered victims of the economic crisis.

 

The prints featured in At Work are drawn from the collection of Marcia and Ambassador John Price.

 

 

Related Projects

 

Men at Work
The inspiration for the At Work: Prints from the Great Depression exhibition came from the recent discovery of a lost 1941 Federal Writers Project book manuscript entitled Men at Work. This manuscript provides a literary portrait of Americans working a variety of jobs during the Depression, and will be published for the first time by the University of Utah Press later this year.

 

Wo/Men at Work
At Work: Prints from the Great Depression is opening in conjunction with Wo/Men at Work, a hand-made artists' book produced by the American West Center and Marriott Library's Red Butte Press. Wo/Men at Work examines the place of women's and men's labor during the 1930s, as well as in more contemporary times, and asks us to meditate on how the production and consumption of work define who we are.


Public Programs

 

At Work Film Series: Pare Lorentz: Documentaries from the 1930s
2:00 p.m. on February 25, 2012, FREE

Pare Lorentz was a well-known film critic before he directed and wrote documentaries in the 1930s for the Roosevelt administration. His films about the Dust Bowl, clear-cutting, and other environmental issues were successful in garnering the director critical acclaim.

 

Evening for Educators
5:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. on March 7, 2012, FREE

Evening for Educators is a workshop designed to help teachers incorporate printmaking in the classroom. The workshop is geared toward educators in all disciplines and grade levels. Teaching packets containing art images and information, biographies of the artists, and lesson plans with across-the-curriculum lessons are available. State in-service credit is available to educators.

 

At Work Film Series: Nine to Five (1980)
2:00 p.m. on March 10, 2012, FREE

Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin and Dolly Parton star in the 1980 comedy Nine to Five. Mistaken identity and miscommunication are at the center of this film as three colleagues fantasize about taking revenge on their "lying, hypocritical" boss.

 

Third Saturday Art Activity for Families: Self Portraits at Work
1:00 p.m.- 4:00 pm on March 17, 2012, FREE

At Work is a collection of Depression-era prints showing men and women at work. Join us in the galleries and the classroom to explore your own ideas about work, and then paint a picture of yourself doing your dream job. Third Saturdays are funded in part by the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks fund.

 

At Work Film Series: Soy Mi Madre (2009)
2:00 p.m. on March 31, 2012, FREE

Released in 2009, Soy Mi Madre examines issues of immigrant populations who live and work in Colorado's Roaring Fork Valley. Inspired by Jean Genet's 1974 film The Maids, the film explores the power dynamics that exist between people of disparate socioeconomic groups.

 

Third Saturday Art Activity for Families: Monoprints
1:00 p.m.- 4:00 pm on April 21, 2012, FREE

The UMFA is full of different kinds of prints this spring. From etchings and engravings to woodcuts and lithographs, prints of all kinds can inspire you to make your own print. Third Saturdays are funded in part by the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks fund.

 

 

About UMFA

As Utah's official state art museum, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) at the University of Utah is the primary cultural resource for global visual arts and culture in the region. The UMFA has long served as a bridge from the University of Utah campus to the broader community, working to engage visitors in making meaningful connections with the world of art. The Museum's permanent collection spans more than 5,000 years of human creativity and features over 18,000 works of art. An ambitious special exhibition program and a variety of educational events are scheduled year-round to foster dialogue and discovery. The UMFA is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive on the campus of the University of Utah. General admission is $7 for adults, $5 for youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty and children under 6 years of age. For more information, call 801 581 7332, visit www.umfa.utah.edu, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.


About AWC

Founded in 1964, the University of Utah's American West Center is the oldest western studies center in the nation. It is considered a national leader in collecting, preserving, interpreting, and disseminating the history and culture of the U.S. West, and in training graduate students as community-engaged scholars and public historians. The Center's principle objective has been to recover and facilitate the telling of marginalized communities' histories. The Center has worked with Latina/o, Japanese, African American, and Pacific Island groups, but is best known for its collaborations with American Indian nations. The Center is widely regarded as at the forefront of oral history practice and methodology. AWC researchers have taken almost 10,000 oral histories over the last forty years. More recently, the Center has undertaken a variety of new media and digital history projects. Examples include the award-winning Utah Indian Curriculum Project, www.utahindians.org, and the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans Oral History Project website. The Center also has a long history of environmentally focused projects, including contract-based research for tribes and governmental agencies on water, grazing, and nuclear energy. These initiatives, the conferences, lectures, and workshops the AWC organizes and sponsors, and the vast majority of the Center's other undertakings, are described in more detail at www.awc.utah.edu.

 

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Georges Rouault: Circus of the Shooting Star

February 3-May 13, 2012

 

CONTACTS:
--Shelbey Lang, UMFA Public Relations Associate, 801-585-1306, shelbey.lang@umfa.utah.edu
--Jenny Woods, UMFA Museum Services Liaison, 801-581-4405, jenny.woods@umfa.utah.edu


Georges Rouault: Circus of the Shooting Star

Families can explore the bold colors of the big top through art, puppets, and programs

 

Salt Lake City, UT - The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is pleased to present Georges Rouault: Cirque de l'Etoile Filante (Circus of the Shooting Star), an exhibition of etchings and wood engravings organized by the Syracuse University Art Galleries. The exhibition, which will be on view in the UMFA Emma Eccles Jones Education Gallery from February 3-May 13, 2012, will encourage adults and children to explore circus themes through art, art making, and programs.

French artist Georges Rouault (1871-1958) was fascinated by the world of the circus, a place where superficial spectacle was often underscored by the performers' sadness. From 1926-1938 Rouault worked with Parisian art dealer and publisher Ambrose Vollard to write and create an illustrated book project called Cirque de l'Etoile Filante (Circus of the Shooting Star). The portfolio includes an introduction of 17 color etchings with aquatint, followed by 82 wood engravings illustrating the text. Rouault intended to strip away the "spangles" of the clown's costume and reveal the "reflection of paradise lost," adding a humanizing element to a subject that had been represented in art since antiquity.

Rouault captured the essence of the circus in his artwork with thick black lines, jewel-tone colors, and curvilinear forms. Often categorized as a Fauvist or Expressionist artist, Rouault's artistic style was influenced by his early apprenticeship in a stained glass studio and his interest in medieval art. He believed that form, color and harmony were hallmarks of the circus, and he strove to create a similar energy in his illustrated book.

"My favorite thing about this exhibition is the way it shows the dual nature of the circus," says Jenny Woods, UMFA museum services liaison. "At first glance you see the bright colors, the acrobats and the costumes; but when you look closer, especially at the portraits of performers, you see personalities and a range of emotions-sadness, boredom, longing and love."

At the UMFA, Georges Rouault: Circus of the Shooting Star will feature all 17 aquatint etchings and a selection of 18 wood engravings from the portfolio. Families may explore the exhibition by using a special gallery guide, making clown or ballerina puppets in the gallery, and putting on their own circus with a special puppet theater.

 

PUBLIC PROGRAMS

 

Art of the Circus Family Celebration
1:00-4:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 18 • FREE Admission

Artists and jugglers and circus balloons, oh my! Join in the fun as the UMFA celebrates the new Georges Rouault: Circus of the Shooting Star exhibition with a circus-themed art event just for families. Enjoy a treasure hunt, face painting, art activities and more.

 

Evening for Educators: Printmaking through the Ages
5:30-8:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 7 • FREE Admission • $5 Donation for Packet

This teacher workshop will show educators from all disciplines and grade levels how to explore printmaking in the classroom. Funded in part by the StateWide Art Partnership.


CIRCUS Film Series
6:00 p.m. on Wednesdays, April 18, April 25 and May 2 • FREE Admission

Over the course of six dramatic hours, the PBS documentary CIRCUS follows the legendary Big Apple Circus on an unforgettable journey from the big top to the back lot, where nail-biting drama unfolds both high in the air and down on the ground. (www.pbs.org)


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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks fund. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

 

 

salt 4: Xaviera Simmons

November 18, 2011-February 27, 2012

 

Contact:

Shelbey Lang, UMFA Public Relations and Marketing Associate,
shelbey.lang@umfa.utah.edu, 801.585.1306

 


salt 4: Xaviera Simmons
Opens in New UMFA Permanent Space for Modern and Contemporary Art

 


Salt Lake City, UT - The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is pleased to present salt 4: Xaviera Simmons, the fourth project in the Museum's series of exhibitions showcasing innovative art from around the world. salt aims to reflect the international impact of contemporary art today, forging local connections to the global, and bringing new and diverse artwork to the city that shares the program's name.

 

Organized by UMFA chief curator Jill Dawsey, the fourth salt installation opens on November 18, 2011 and will remain on view through February 27, 2012 in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at the University of Utah. The exhibition will be located in a newly designated salt gallery on the UMFA's second floor and will accompany the debut of an adjacent permanent space for the museum's growing modern and contemporary art collection.

 

Featured artist Xaviera Simmons will travel from New York City to Salt Lake City to install the artworks in salt 4: Xaviera Simmons. The exhibition will include a series of large-format photographs and an intricate sculptural wall installation made on site using locally-sourced wood.


Simmons uses photography, installation, video, audio and performance to construct open-ended narratives inspired by collective histories and mythologies. Her work often references traditions of landscape as found in painting, photography, and film, emphasizing the characters that inhabit these spaces. In her large-format photographs, the landscape is often the central character, harboring the stories of travelers, migrants, and gypsies.


A highlight of salt 4: Xaviera Simmons will be the sculptural installation on the west wall of the new salt gallery. In the week leading up to the exhibition opening, Simmons will hand paint and letter hundreds of found wooden pieces in the museum's Great Hall during public hours. She will individually inscribe each of them with text and symbols gleaned from multiple sources, including film dialogues, travel notes, folklore, news articles, and poetry. The painted wooden parts will then be affixed directly to the salt gallery wall on the second floor, forming a new kind of lyrical landscape imbued with historical and personal memory.


Xaviera Simmons was born in New York City and currently lives and works in New York and Paris. She received a BFA in photography from Bard College in 2004 after spending two years on a walking pilgrimage retracing the Trans Atlantic Slave Trade with Buddhist monks. She completed the Whitney Museum of American Art's Independent Study Program in Studio Art (2005) while simultaneously completing a two-year actor-training conservatory with The Maggie Flanigan Studio (2006). Major exhibitions and performances have taken place at The Museum of Modern Art (2010 and 2011); The Studio Museum In Harlem (five exhibitions from 2004-2010); The Nasher Museum Of Art at Duke University (2010); The Sculpture Center, New York (2009); and The Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston (2008). Simmons is a recipient of The David Driskell Prize, a Jerome Foundation Travel/Study Fellowship, and an Art Matters Fellowship among many others. Simmons is one of three 2011-2012 Artists In Residence at The Studio Museum In Harlem and she will travel to Colombo, Sri Lanka in 2012 as part of The U.S Department of State's smART Power Initiative.

 

The UMFA's salt series affirms the Museum's commitment to the art of today and tomorrow, demonstrating that contemporary art is vital, dynamic, and socially relevant.

 

Programming
Visiting Artist Talk: A Conversation with Artist Xaviera Simmons

7 p.m. on Friday, November 18, 2011
Join UMFA chief curator Jill Dawsey for a conversation with salt 4 artist, Xaviera Simmons. Learn about Simmons's artistic practice and philosophy in this free public program on opening night.


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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

David Burnett – Too Close

October 7, 2011-January 29, 2012

 

Contact:
--Shelbey Lang, UMFA Public Relations and Marketing Associate, 801-585-5198, shelbey.lang@umfa.utah.edu

 

Critical Moments of Our History Captured in Photographs

 

Salt Lake City, UT - The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is pleased to present David Burnett - Too Close, a look at a lifetime of iconic events captured by eminent photojournalist David Burnett (b. 1946). The exhibition will be on view in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at the University of Utah from October 7, 2011 through January 29, 2012. Burnett will travel from New York to Salt Lake City to give a free public lecture at the UMFA on October 6 at 6 pm.

 

Organized by Jill Dawsey, chief curator at the UMFA, David Burnett - Too Close comprises over 50 photographs by Burnett, offering museum visitors a glimpse into critical moments of the 20th and 21st centuries. Recognized as one of the "100 Most Important People in Photography" by American Photo Magazine, Burnett has traveled to over 80 countries to cover wars, political figures, celebrities, and ordinary people in everyday life.

 

A Salt Lake City native, Burnett began his career as a freelancer for Time and LIFE magazines. In 1976 he co-founded Contact Press Images, a photo agency in New York City. Over the past four decades, he has covered such pivotal events as the Vietnam War, the 1984 drought in Ethiopia, Hurricane Katrina in 2006, and the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. Burnett is also known for capturing intimate images of public figures ranging from Barack Obama to Bob Marley.

 

His numerous awards include the National Press Photographers Association's Magazine Photographer of Year, the World Press Photo of the Year, and Best Campaign Picture. National Geographic described Burnett as "someone who can-no matter how challenging the assignment-return with the picture."

 

"We are delighted and honored to welcome this world-renowned photojournalist back to his hometown," said Jill Dawsey, chief curator at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts. "Burnett's body of work is astonishing both for its formal innovations-he is an expert in so many photographic techniques and technologies-and for the expansive sweep of late 20th and 21st century history that he has captured."

 

David Burnett - Too Close is generously sponsored by the Joseph and Evelyn Rosenblatt Charitable Fund.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks fund. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

Color

September 16, 2011-January 8, 2012

 

Contacts:
--Shelbey Peterson, UMFA Public Relations and Marketing Associate, 801-585-5198, shelbey.peterson@umfa.utah.edu
--Megan Hallett, UMFA Curator of Education, 801-585-7190, megan.hallett@umfa.utah.edu

 

 

A Hands-on Exhibition for All Ages



Salt Lake City, UT - Why do some colors seem warm, while others seem cool? Does your favorite color spark a specific memory? The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is pleased to present a multidimensional exhibition exploring one of the basic elements of art: color. Designed for museum visitors of all ages, this exhibition explores how and why artists use color, how colors relate to one another, and the ways in which we, as viewers, respond to color in art and our lives.

Organized by UMFA Curator of Education Megan Hallett and the entire UMFA education staff, Color will be on view in the Emma Eccles Jones Education Gallery in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at the University of Utah from September 16, 2011-January 8, 2012.

Color showcases over twenty vibrant works from the UMFA's collection, featuring works by such artists as Robert Motherwell, Alex Katz, and Anna Campbell Bliss. The artworks come from all over the globe to highlight the ways in which color serves as a connector across cultures and time.

To illustrate color theory, the artworks were grouped according to the three primary colors: red, yellow, and blue. The grouped artworks were then placed on walls painted with their complementary color: green, purple, and orange. Together, the artworks and gallery walls became one educational piece.

Visitors of all ages are invited to experiment with color at a bright and fun interactive station within the exhibition. The UMFA encourages adults, students, and children to participate in the hands-on collage wall, where they can create their own color compositions.

"We are thrilled to present this innovative exhibition about a very basic and critically important element of art," says Gretchen Dietrich, executive director of the UMFA. "The exhibition will engage visitors of all ages in thinking about the profound impact that color has on us each and every day."

Color is funded as part of the UMFA's Art in a Box program and is presented in conjunction with the debut of a new box devoted entirely to color. Art in a Box is an educational outreach program designed to provide free art instruction, art supplies, and curriculum-based materials to classrooms across Utah. For more information the Art in a Box program, please call (801) 581-3580 or visit umfa.utah.edu/artinabox.



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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks fund. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

 

Final Light: V. Douglas Snow in Retrospect

August 31-January 8

 

Contacts:
Shelbey Peterson | UMFA | shelbey.peterson@umfa.utah.edu | 801.585.1306
Talia Ullmann | Art Center | taliau@slartcenter.org | 801.328.4201 x 125
Emily Brunt | Art Center | emilyb@slartcenter.org | 801.328.4201 x 115

 

The Art Center and UMFA Team Up to Celebrate Artist's Life and Work


SALT LAKE CITY, UT -Salt Lake Art Center and the Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) are pleased to present Final Light: V. Douglas Snow in Retrospect, a joint exhibition celebrating the work of eminent Utah artist Doug Snow (1927-2009). Opening on August 31, 2011, the exhibition will showcase a large body of work presented in two locations, and will debut with a free public celebration at both venues on opening night.

A painter, printmaker, and professor, Doug Snow lived and worked in Utah's red rock country for over half a century. Snow began his formal art training in 1946 at the American Art School and Columbia University in New York City, and finished his degrees at the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomsfield Hills, Michigan. After concluding his studies, Snow moved back to his home state of Utah to paint Capitol Reef's mesas and mountains.

In 1957 Snow was featured in Life magazine, establishing him as a nationally recognized artist at the age of 30. He became a devoted educator, working as a professor in the University of Utah Department of Art for 35 years, and serving as department chair from 1966-1971. Today, Snow's artwork is part of numerous local and national collections, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, the Springville Museum of Art, and the Museum of Art at Brigham Young University.

Organized by guest curator Frank McEntire, Final Light: V. Douglas Snow in Retrospect presents defining works from Snow's career, featuring 35 paintings from private and public collections across the West. The retrospective exhibition examines Snow's early Abstract Expressionist-inspired period from the 1950s, as well as later works from the last three decades of his life, which combine abstraction with realism to express his passion for Utah's southern desert.

"The invitation to curate this exhibition offered a rare opportunity to pay tribute to my friend and colleague," says Frank McEntire. "Even opening the exhibition simultaneously in two of the state's most venerable art institutions, it was a challenge to represent the depth and range of his work from the 1950's forward, and I hope we were able to do it justice."

By visiting both venues, art lovers will be offered a comprehensive view look at the life and art of Doug Snow. Salt Lake Art Center will present 21 intimate works by Snow, on view through October 22, 2011, and the UMFA will display 14 large-scale paintings by the artist through January 8, 2012. The UMFA thanks exhibition presenting sponsors The Sam & Diane Stewart Family Foundation and the John and Marcia Price Family Foundation. The Art Center wishes to thank JEPS Foundation, Bonnie Phillips, and Stremmel Gallery.

The public is invited to celebrate the opening of Final Light: V. Douglas Snow in Retrospect for free at the Art Center and UMFA on August 31 from 5-8 pm. Visitors are encouraged to travel on the UTA TRAX Line, conveniently located near both venues. For information on TRAX schedules, please visit www.rideuta.com.

"The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is proud to be working collaboratively with the Salt Lake Art Center to present the work of this important Utah artist," says Gretchen Dietrich, executive director of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts. "Doug Snow's legacy as a teacher and artist will live long into the future, and these joint exhibitions are a wonderful way to remember an artist loved by so many. We are also thrilled to introduce the work of such an important figure to a new generation of art lovers in our community."

"Doug Snow will always remain one of the giants of the Utah art world," says Adam Price, executive director of Salt Lake Art Center. "The Art Center is proud to collaborate with Frank McEntire and the Utah Museum of Fine Art to present this comprehensive examination of Snow's artistic life."

Visit www. slartcenter.org or www.umfa.utah.edu for details.

Salt Lake Art Center
Salt Lake Art Center is Utah's premiere venue for contemporary art, and was recognized as Best Museum in the state of Utah for 2011. Founded in 1931 and now located in the heart of Salt Lake City, the Art Center exhibits groundbreaking work by leading local and international artists. Recent exhibitions include Robert Fontenot's The Place This Is, a conceptual exploration of the stories and histories of Utah and America through materials commonly associated with the domestic realm; Contemporary Masters: Artist-Designed Miniature Golf and Lawn Gnomes Eat Your Hearts Out, a community public sculpture initiative designed to move the very best in contemporary art outside the four walls of the gallery and into places where people work, live, and play. Current exhibitions include: Fallen Fruit of Utah, a state-wide collaboration with museums and individuals about the role of fruit in Utah's history, led by artist collective Fallen Fruit; and upcoming, the annual installment of Sundance Film Festival New Frontier and Play Me I'm Yours, inviting the people of Salt Lake to show off their piano skills on street corners all over Salt Lake. The inaugural round of the new Locals Only Gallery opens August 31, 2011. The Art Center rounds out its offerings with a lively mix of award-winning educational programs, film screenings, panel discussions, and events celebrating Salt Lake's vibrant local art scene. Salt Lake Art Center is located at 20 S. West Temple, just off the intersection with South Temple. Admission is free year-round. Business hours are Tuesday-Thursday: 11 am-6 pm; Friday: 11 am-9 pm; Saturday: 11 am-6 pm; closed Sunday and Monday. For more information call (801) 328-4201 or visit www.slartcenter.org.

Utah Museum of Fine Arts
As Utah's official state art museum, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts is the primary cultural resource for global visual arts in the region. The UMFA has long served as a bridge from the University of Utah campus to the broader community, working to engage visitors in making meaningful connections with the world of art. In 2011 the UMFA was granted the high national recognition of reaccreditation from the American Association of Museums, establishing the UMFA as one of only two accredited museums in Salt Lake City. The UMFA's permanent collection spans more than 5,000 years of human creativity and features over 18,000 works. Special exhibitions make each visit a new experience, and a variety of public programs are scheduled year-round to encourage dialogue and discovery. Visitors have the opportunity to enjoy a light lunch of sandwiches, salads, coffee, and pastries in The Museum Café and are welcome to browse eclectic and artistic keepsakes in The Museum Store. Recent exhibitions include The Smithson Effect, an ambitious contemporary art exhibition showcasing the work of 23 international artists inspired by Robert Smithson; Helen Levitt Photographs, an exhibition of works from the 1930s and 40s by one of the most important photographers of the twentieth century; and LeConte Stewart: Depression Era Art, a collaborative exhibition with the Church History Museum featuring more than 200 paintings and works on paper by the renowned Utah artist. The UMFA is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. General admission is $7 for adults, $5 for youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, college students in Utah, active duty military families, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks Fund. Museum hours are Tuesday-Friday: 10 am-5 pm; Wednesdays: 10 am-8 pm; Weekends: 11 am-5 pm; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

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LeConte Stewart: One Artist. Two Exhibitions. Over 200 Works.

July 21, 2011-January 15, 2012

 

Contacts:
Shelbey Peterson | UMFA | shelbey.peterson@umfa.utah.edu | 801.585.1306
Patrick Dunshee | Church History Museum | pdunshee@ldschurch.org | 801.240.0947

 

SALT LAKE CITY, UT – The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) and LDS Church History Museum are pleased to announce the largest joint exhibitions ever presented of work by beloved Utah artist LeConte Stewart (1891-1990). On view from July 21, 2011 through January 15, 2012, the exhibitions will collectively feature more than 200 paintings and works on paper, providing insight into the life and work of one of the state’s most accomplished artists.

 

Best known for realistic portrayals of Utah’s rural and urban landscapes, Stewart’s contributions to art of the West spanned 75 years and resulted in the creation of thousands of artworks. Wallace Stegner compared Stewart’s work to that of Edward Hopper, but he is most often compared to American Scene and Regionalist artists of the 1920s and 1930s.

 

Stewart took classes at the University of Utah before conducting his serious art study in New York and Pennsylvania.  After returning to northern Utah he frequently took trips to central Utah to paint the small towns, farms and deserts of his childhood. A committed educator, Stewart was an art instructor at Ogden High School before serving as chairman of the Art Department at the University of Utah from 1938 to 1956. Until his death in 1990, Stewart created artworks nearly every day along the roads or in the fields near his home.

 

LeConte Stewart: Depression Era Art was organized for the Utah Museum of Fine Arts by Donna Poulton, UMFA associate curator of art of Utah and the West.  The exhibition features more than 130 paintings and works on paper from the 1930s. During this period Stewart turned to what he described as the “raw side of life,” depicting storefronts, gas stations, and old homes in his community through minimal forms and expressive color, evoking images of abandonment and isolation. The UMFA thanks title sponsors the S.J. and Jessie E. Quinney Foundation and the Ray, Quinney & Nebeker Foundation.

 

The Church History Museum presents LeConte Stewart: The Soul of Rural Utah, an exhibition developed by museum curator Robert Davis, featuring approximately 120 landscape paintings and works on paper. Using rich tones, thick impasto and impressionistic brushstrokes, Stewart painted throughout his career farmhouses, barns and other familiar scenes that convey the heritage of Mormon settlement. For Stewart, true art was usually not found in perfect natural compositions or the most paintable subjects, but rather in humble and visually unpretentious scenes—made beautiful by the soul of an artist who loved them and expressed them with integrity and sensitivity.

 

“In partnership with our colleagues at the Church History Museum, the UMFA is proud to present the stunning work of LeConte Stewart with the aim of cementing Stewart's legacy in the art of our state and the region,” says Gretchen Dietrich, UMFA executive director.

 

“We are thrilled to be opening this exhibition in conjunction with the UMFA,” says director of the Church History Museum, Kurt Graham. “It is appropriate for our two institutions to collaborate in honoring one of Utah’s premier artists.”

 

By experiencing both exhibitions, museum visitors will be offered a comprehensive look at the art of LeConte Stewart and will explore his landscapes in differing and complementary ways. Visitors are encouraged to travel on the UTA TRAX Line, conveniently located near both venues.  For information on TRAX schedules, please visit www.rideuta.com.

 

Visit www.umfa.utah.edu or www.lds.org/museum for exhibition and program details.

 

Church History Museum 

At the Church History Museum, exhibitions and educational programs tell the story of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The museum preserves and displays Mormon art and artifacts from all over the world.  Permanent exhibitions, changing exhibitions on special themes, and programs for children and adults offer educational experiences for the whole family.  Located next to the main lobby, the museum store is the perfect place to find postcards, posters, prints, note cards and gifts.  Museum highlights include: a full size historic log home; look into a covered wagon or size up a pioneer handcart; a historic timeline of the Church through the Covenant Restored exhibition (self-guided or docent led tour); an interactive children’s exhibition on the Book of Mormon; death masks of church founder Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum Smith; and a full size statue of the Angel Moroni, a copy of which stands on the pinnacle of every LDS temple. Admission to the Church History Museum is free. Open seven days a week except holidays. Hours are Monday-Friday: 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday: 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Public parking lots are available nearby.  More information is available at (801) 240-3310 or online at www.ChurchHistoryMuseum.org.


Utah Museum of Fine Arts 

As Utah’s official state art museum, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts is the primary cultural resource for global visual arts in the region. The UMFA has long served as a bridge from campus to the broader community, working to engage visitors in making meaningful connections with the world of art. The UMFA’s permanent collection spans more than 5,000 years of human creativity and features over 18,000 works. Special exhibitions make each visit a new experience, and a variety of public programs are scheduled year-round to encourage dialogue and discovery. Visitors have the opportunity to enjoy a light lunch of sandwiches, salads, coffee, and pastries in The Museum Café and are welcome to browse eclectic and artistic keepsakes in The Museum Store. The UMFA is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive; parking is available in lots just east of the museum. General admission is $7 for adults, $5 for youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, college students in Utah, active duty military families, and children under six years old. Free admission is offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks Fund. Museum hours are Tuesday–Friday: 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Wednesdays: 10 a.m.–8 p.m.; Weekends: 11 a.m.–5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays.  For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

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2011

2010

2009

2008

 

salt 3: Cyprien Gaillard

May 26 - August 21, 2011

 


Salt Lake City, UT - The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is pleased to present salt 3: Cyprien Gaillard, the third in the museum's new series of exhibitions featuring innovative art from around the world. salt aims to reflect the international impact of contemporary art today, forging local connections to the global, and bringing new and diverse artwork to the city that shares the program's name.

 

Organized by Jill Dawsey, UMFA acting chief curator and curator of modern and contemporary art, the third salt installation will be on view through August 21, 2011 in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at the University of Utah. The exhibition will be located in a newly designed black box gallery on the UMFA's first floor.

 

In the past few years French-born, Berlin-based Cyprien Gaillard (b. 1980) has emerged as a major voice in the international art scene. He works in a variety of media, including film, video, photography, and installation. The young artist's work often examines architectural ruins of the recent past, working in the artistic traditions of Romanticism and Land Art to engage ideas of displacement, disenchantment, and decay in our contemporary landscape.

 

salt 3: Cyprien Gaillard showcases a nine-minute, 16mm film entitled Cities of Gold and Mirrors (2009). This non-narrative, five-segment film raises questions about the built environment, the appropriation of culture, and historical progress.

 

Shot in Cancun, Mexico, the film opens with scenes of young Americans engaged in spring break debauchery, set against a backdrop of a hotel resort designed to emulate an ancient Mayan pyramid. Viewers next encounter a seemingly tranquil scene of dolphin fins breaking the water, swimming in a hotel pool. A Bloods gang member is then shown performing a slow, ritual dance upon Las Ruinas del Rey, a site of Mayan ruins not far from the popular tourist resorts. The film shifts its focus to a large mirrored building that violently implodes, in a scene reminiscent of action movies. The final segment shows viewers the ceiling of a disco in Cancun, with its spectacular blinking lights The entire film is set to an eerie, synthesized soundtrack, a theme song borrowed from a French-Japanese produced cartoon of the 1980s called The Mysterious Cities of Gold, which told the story of an orphan boy who joins a group of Spanish conquistadors.

 

In Cities of Gold and Mirrors, Gaillard establishes parallels between the consumption of alcohol and architecture, linking the drinking rituals of spring breakers to the degradation of the modern ruin. It would seem that Gaillard believes we inherit yesterday's architecture and urban planning in the form of a hangover-a hangover of the historical variety.

 

Gaillard's work is also featured in the UMFA's current exhibition, The Smithson Effect, and Robert Smithson's influence is also apparent in Cities of Gold and Mirrors. The film's scenes of modern architectural ruins and spectacular demolition seem to fulfill Smithson's paradoxical vision of buildings that would "rise into ruin," becoming new kinds of monuments through acts of destruction.

 

Cyprien Gaillard was awarded the Prix Marcel Duchamp in 2010 and his work is featured in the 54th International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale (2011). He has had solo exhibitions throughout Europe, Mexico, and the United States, including at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; Kunsthalle Basel, Switzerland; Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, OH; MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, MA; Proyectos Monclova, Mexico City; Museo de Contemporáneo de Castilla y León, Spain; L'Atelier du Jeu de Paume, Paris; and the Hayward Gallery, London. His work has also been included in numerous group exhibitions at the MoMA, New York (2010); the Eighth Gwanju Biennial (2010); Centre Pompidou, Paris (2010); Baibakov Art Projects, Moscow (2010); New Museum, New York (2009); and the 5th Berlin Biennial, Germany (2008).

 

The UMFA's salt series affirms the Museum's commitment to the art of today and tomorrow, demonstrating that contemporary art is vital, dynamic, and socially relevant.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

Low Lives 3: International Networked Performances Come to Utah

April 29 and 30

 

Contacts:
--Jorge Rojas, Low Lives Founder/Producer/Curator, keoqui@gmail.com, 917.757.7626
--Jill Dawsey, UMFA Acting Chief Curator, jill.dawsey@umfa.utah.edu, 801.585.3475
--Shelbey Peterson, UMFA PR Associate, shelbey.peterson@umfa.utah.edu, 801.585.1306

 

Salt Lake City, UT - The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is pleased to announce its participation in Low Lives 3, an international exhibition featuring live performance-based works transmitted over the web and projected in real time at multiple venues around the world.

 

A first-time venue, the UMFA will host New York City-based artist Kristin Lucas for a live performance piece as part of Low Lives 3. Lucas's performance, along with others taking place around the globe, will be streamed online and screened for public viewing at the UMFA. Low Lives 3 will take place in the UMFA's G.W. Anderson Family Great Hall on Friday, April 29 from 6-10 pm and Saturday, April 30 from 1-4 pm. The event is open to the public and free with general museum admission.

 

About Low Lives
Founded in 2009 by artist and independent curator Jorge Rojas, the annual Low Lives exhibition highlights works that critically investigate, challenge, and extend the potential of performative practices. The project celebrates the transmission of ideas beyond geographical and cultural borders, offering global audiences the opportunity to consider live performance in both physical and virtual space.

 

By organizing performances at numerous venues and then broadcasting them via online networks, Low Lives provides a new model for efficiently presenting, viewing, and archiving live performance-based art. The annual exhibition embraces low-tech aesthetics, such as low pixel images and muddled sound quality, to emphasize the raw, inquisitive quality of the broadcast and reception of the works.

 

"Low Lives is not simply about the presentation of performative gestures at a particular place and time," Rojas explains, "it is also about the transmission of these moments and what gets lost, conveyed, blurred, and reconfigured when utilizing this medium."

 

About Low Lives 3
Low Lives 3 will feature more than fifty live performances over two days, streamed in real-time at venues across the globe, and will include a spotlight on contemporary choreography throughout the event. The exhibition will begin on Friday, April 29 from 6-10 pm (MST) and continue on Saturday, April 30 from 1-4 pm (MST).

 

Low Lives 3 is co-produced by Chez Bushwick, an artist-run organization based in Brooklyn, New York. Chez Bushwick is dedicated to the advancement of interdisciplinary art and performance and places a special emphasis on new choreography.


Participating artists include: Annie Abrahams; Lukas Avendaño; Brian Balderston and Chloe Bass; Camille Baker; Tzitzi Barrantes; Rachelle Beaudoin; Black & Jones; Caroline Boileau; Catherine Cabeen and Company; Jennifer Chan; Tyrone Davies; Joseph DeLappe; dev01ded; Alfred Dong; Nancy Douthey; Eosin; Julie Fotheringham and Jarryd Lowder; Second Front; Deborah Goffe; Carlos Gonzalez; Katelena Hernandez; Ajeesh K.B., Santhosh V.S., and Hemabharathy Palani; Jayson Keeling; La La La Singers; Shaun El C. Leonardo; Anya Liftig; Kristin Lucas; James Mbunju and Company; Saul Melman; Marcello Mercado; Jui Mhatre and Jaee Joshi; Julio Morales; Irvin Morazan and Maya Jeffereis; Kendall Nordin; Molly O'Connor/Molliver; So Percussion; SaBa; Marisol Salanova; Rosa Sanchez and Alain Baumann; Byd Sarret; Jenny Schlief; Carmen Sober; Alan Sondheim; Nathan Stevens; Zornitsa Stoyanova; Channel TWo; Frans van Lent; Claude van Lingen; Ginna Vélez; Rodell Warner; Ian Warren; Dr. Heather Warren-Crow; Rebecca Weiner; and Paul Wiersbinski.

 

Now in its third year, Low Lives has expanded its reach to over twenty presenting partners from all corners of the world. Presenting partners include: Alice Yard, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago; Aljira, A Center for Contemporary Art, Newark, New Jersey; Attakkalari Centre for Movement Arts, Bangalore, India; Center for Performance Research, Brooklyn, New York; Chez Bushwick, Brooklyn, New York; Co-lab, Austin, Texas; QMAD, Queens Media Art Development in partnership with Crossing Art Gallery, Queens, New York; Diaspora Vibe Gallery in partnership with AE District, Miami, Florida; DiverseWorks in partnership with Box 13, Houston, Texas; Elon University Department of Art & Art History, Elon, North Carolina; Fusebox Festival, Austin, Texas; Konic Thtr, Barcelona, Spain; La Periferia, Mérida, Yucatán, México; La Perrera in partneship with MACO, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Oaxaca, Oaxaca, México; Living Arts, Tulsa, Oklahoma; Mascher Space Co-op, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Mindpirates, Berlin, Germany; Obsidian Arts, Minneapolis, Minnesota; On the Boards, Seattle, Washington; Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Portland, Oregon; Real Art Ways, Hartford, Connecticut; Simba Theatre Art International in partnership with Village Museum, Dar es Salaam City, Tanzania; SOMArts, San Francisco, California; the temporary space, Japan; and Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Salt Lake City, Utah.

 

Low Lives 3 is funded in part by The Experimental Television Funds program. The Experimental Television Center's Presentation Funds program is supported by the New York State Council on the Arts.

 

For more information, please visit www.lowlives.net.

 

About Jorge Rojas
Jorge Rojas is the founder, producer, and curator of Low Lives. A multidisciplinary artist and independent curator, he was born in Morelos, Mexico and studied art at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City and at Bellas Artes in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. Rojas engages in traditional, new, and performative media. His work often investigates communication systems and the effect of technology on artistic production, social structures, and communities. His artwork and curatorial projects have been exhibited in galleries and museums in the United States, Mexico, Brazil, and India. Rojas has received grants and fellowships including National Performance Network's VAN Residency, West Chicago City Museum Artist in Residency Program, and Vermont Studio Center.

 

About Kristin Lucas
Multimedia artist Kristin Lucas addresses our complex relationship to the digital realm by raising questions about the gap between virtual and lived realities. Engaging strategies of art and intervention, she works within the context of public and private systems. Lucas has carried out exchanges, both empty and meaningful, with automative tellers, healing art therapists, relative strangers, and a judge. Lucas holds a BFA from Cooper Union and an MFA from Stanford University. Her work has been exhibited internationally and she is represented by Postmasters Gallery and Electronic Arts Intermix in New York. The artist's website is www.kristinlucas.com.

 

About the Utah Museum of Fine Arts
The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. As Utah's premier visual arts resource, the UMFA inspires visitors of all ages to discover meaningful connections with the world of art. The UMFA's permanent collection features some 18,000 works from antiquity to contemporary art. Special exhibitions make each visit a new experience, and a variety of public programs are scheduled year-round to encourage dialogue and discovery. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, free for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays.

 

For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

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The Smithson Effect

March 10 - July 3, 2011

 

Salt Lake City, UT- The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is pleased to premier The Smithson Effect, an exhibition highlighting the pervasive presence of artist Robert Smithson (1938-1973) in contemporary art since the 1990s. The most ambitious contemporary art exhibition ever organized by the UMFA, The Smithson Effect brings together, for the first time, a broad spectrum of work by international artists who share a profound debt to Smithson's art and ideas.

 

The Smithson Effect features sculpture, video, photography, installation, and sound art by twenty-three leading artists. Organized by Acting Chief Curator Jill Dawsey, the exhibition occupies over 4,000 square feet in the museum's first-floor galleries and will be on view in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at the University of Utah from March 10 through July 3, 2011.

 

Perhaps the most influential artist of the postwar period, Smithson is best known for his pioneering earthworks created during the 1960s and 70s, such as the famous Spiral Jetty (1970) in Utah's Great Salt Lake. If the site of artistic creation had traditionally been the artist's studio, Smithson took this activity into the unbounded landscape. He redefined the terms of art's display and exhibition, establishing a new relationship between the ‘site' of the landscape and the ‘nonsite' of the gallery.

 

Smithson's legacy, however, extends far beyond his revolutionary use of land as an artistic medium. In addition to earthworks, Smithson produced sculpture, drawings, collages, paintings, photographs, films, and extensive writings. His practice of working across various mediums, which was once unusual, has become widespread among artists today.

 

A significant number of artists in the mid-to-late 1990s turned to Smithson's work as a source of inspiration. Artists continue to explore Smithson's radical ideas on the subjects of entropy, land use, anti-monuments, natural history, and language, which have critically shaped contemporary art, as evidenced in the dozens of works in The Smithson Effect.


The Smithson Effect includes work by the following artists: Adam Bateman, Walead Beshty, Matthew Buckingham, Tom Burr, Center for Land Use Interpretation, Peter Coffin, Tacita Dean, Mark Dion, Sam Durant, Shannon Ebner, Cyprien Gaillard, Amy Granat and Drew Heitzler, Renée Green, Simon Leung, Debora Ligorio, Ann Lislegaard, Florian Maier-Aichen, Vik Muniz, Lee Ranaldo, Alexis Rockman, Melanie Smith, and Tony Tasset.

 

A number of artists in The Smithson Effect focus their attention on earthworks by Smithson that have been lost or destroyed. A key point of reference is Smithson's Partially Buried Woodshed (1970), which was created by dumping twenty loads of dirt onto the roof of an abandoned shed until it collapsed under the weight. Sited at Kent State University in Ohio, Partially Buried Woodshed became an unofficial memorial in the wake of the killings of four students by the National Guard during a protest against the US invasion of Cambodia, just months after the earthwork's creation. The work was eventually removed from the Kent State campus by University administration.

 

Artists Renée Green and Sam Durant both take Partially Buried Woodshed as a starting point for their own pieces in The Smithson Effect. In Green's films, Partially Buried (1996) and Partially Buried Continued (1997), she documents her search for the woodshed, acting as a kind of archaeologist (as Smithson might have done), investigating the sites on campus and excavating artifacts from the past. In Sam Durant's 1998 sculpture Partially Buried 1960s/70s Dystopia Revealed (Mick Jagger at Altamont) & Utopia Reflected (Wavy Gravy at Woodstock), he places mounds of dirt atop rectangular mirrors that lay flat on the floor, recalling Smithson's ‘Nonsite' sculptures. Inside the mounds are speakers, one emitting the voice of folk hero Wavy Gravy at Woodstock in 1969, another playing audio of Mick Jagger trying to calm the crowd at the Altamont Free Concert, an event that seemed to symbolize the end of the 1960s.

 

Looking to another 1970s earthwork as a point of reference, artist and musician Lee Ranaldo pays homage to Smithson's Amarillo Ramp in his audio recording Amarillo Ramp (For Robert Smithson) (1995). Smithson died in 1973 while choosing a site in Texas for Amarillo Ramp, which was completed posthumously by his wife, artist Nancy Holt. Ranaldo, best known as the guitarist for the seminal rock group Sonic Youth, operates outside the conventional modes of music making in Amarillo Ramp (for Robert Smithson), treating sound as a material to be manipulated and sculpted; his sound piece evokes the slow grade and circular curve of Smithson's earthwork.

 

A recurring theme in many works featured in The Smithson Effect is that of entropy, or the second law of thermodynamics, which describes how matter inexorably loses energy, moving from a state of order to disorder. Smithson was fascinated by this concept, which for him implied time on a geological scale beyond that of human activity. Artist Matthew Buckingham conjures up the entropic process in his piece The Six Grandfathers, Paha Sapa, in the Year 502,002 C.E. (2002). Buckingham's installation includes a photograph that has been digitally altered to appear as scientists imagine the mountains of Paha Sapa-better known as Mount Rushmore-will look in the year 502,002 C.E. The photograph asks us to consider the inevitable erosion of this seemingly eternal monument, the erasure of presidential figures carved in stone.

 

As featured artist Tacita Dean has said, "Robert Smithson has become an important figure in my working life, not because I depend on him in any way, but because his work allows me a conceptual space where I can often reside." Smithson's work, ideas, and processes have played a crucial role in the course that contemporary art has taken during the last two decades, and his legacy continues to provide a conceptual space for artists to reside.

 

"We are delighted to present this exhibition, which has been in the works for almost three years," said Gretchen Dietrich, UMFA Executive Director. "While Smithson's influence is widely acknowledged, no institution has attempted to survey or assess how it shapes the landscape of contemporary art. The Smithson Effect takes the pulse of the contemporary art world and discovers that Smithson's example is at the heart of much work made in the past two decades."

 

The Smithson Effect is generously presented by the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation.

 


RELATED PROGRAMMING

 

Spiral Jetty Online Resource
Now available at www.umfa.utah.edu/spiraljetty

The Smithson Effect is accompanied by a virtual online resource created to provide information about Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty. Designed by Cris Baczek, this program is intended for viewers who may or may not have visited the earthwork in person, and includes a time-lapsed video of a journey from the UMFA to Spiral Jetty, interviews with art historians and environmental experts, video accounts of personal experiences visiting the work, and links to additional information.

 

The Smithson Effect Audio Stops
The UMFA is pleased to offer six short audio stops that highlight specific works in the exhibition. Learn more about five featured artists and their work by using your cell phone, borrowing an MP3 player from the front desk, or downloading them to your iPod from http://umfa.utah.edu/audiostops for free.

 

"Artists on Smithson"
Saturday, April 2 • 2-4 pm

Join us for short talks by artists featured in The Smithson Effect, including Matthew Coolidge of the Center for Land Use Interpretation, Sam Durant, and Melanie Smith, followed by panel discussion mediated by Jill Dawsey, UMFA Acting Chief Curator.

 

"Viral Jetty: The Smithson Effect in Literature"
Wednesday, April, 13 • 6 pm

Professor Craig Dworkin of the Department of English at the University of Utah will discuss Smithson's influence on writers.

 

Film: Spiral Jetty
Wednesday, April 27 • 7 pm

It's movie night at the UMFA. Enjoy a feature screening of Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty (1970) in the UMFA Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke, Jr. Auditorium.

 

"Robert Smithson and the Spiral Jetty: the Center and the Circumference"
Wednesday, May 11 • 7 pm

Don't miss this lecture by Hikmet Sidney Loe, author of the forthcoming book The Spiral Jetty and Rozel Point: Rotating Through Time and Place (Utah State University Press, 2012).

 

Film: Spiral Jetty
Wednesday, June 8 • 7 pm

It's movie night at the UMFA. Enjoy a feature screening of Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty (1970) in the UMFA Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke, Jr. Auditorium.

 


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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks fund, free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

Helen Levitt Photographs

Opens February 24, 2011

 

Salt Lake City, UT- In the words of author Robert Coles, "Helen Levitt has had the uncanny ability to offer us those brief, revealing moments in everyday life that give our time here meaning." The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is pleased to present Helen Levitt Photographs, an exhibition celebrating the influential works of one of the most important photographers of the twentieth century. This exhibition is presented with support from Albion Financial Group.

 

Consisting of more than thirty photographs from the museum's permanent collection, Helen Levitt Photographs will be on view in the UMFA's second-floor LDS Galleria from February 24, 2011-June 12, 2011. Many of the works in this exhibition were donated to the UMFA by Helen Levitt's family, including her brother, Bill Levitt (1917-2009), of Alta, Utah; Bill's wife, Mimi Levitt; Bill's son, Toby Levitt, of Salt Lake City, Utah; and Toby's wife, Heather Levitt.

 

This presentation of photographs highlights key periods in the career of artist Helen Levitt (1913-2009), with a special focus on her urban street images of children and everyday life in the late 1930s and early 1940s--when Levitt emerged as a key member of the New York School photographers--as well as later works from her long and accomplished career.

 

A native of Brooklyn, New York, Levitt was a self-taught photographer who lived and worked in the same place for over seventy years. Levitt began her photography career in 1931 when she dropped out of high school to work for commercial photographer J. Florian Mitchell. During this period, Levitt came to know several leading photographers of the time, including Henri Cartier-Bresson, Walker Evans, and Ben Shahn, and she was greatly influenced by their desire to inspire social change through photography.

 

Levitt began her life-long fascination with urban street life in 1937 while teaching a children's art class. She became fascinated with ephemeral chalk drawings on New York City streets, and soon began photographing the transitory drawings and the children who made them. From that time on, Levitt focused her work on children who viewed the streets as their playground, and the everyday lives of ordinary people in the city's working class neighborhoods. Levitt's black and white photographs during the 1930s and 40s captured fleeting moments in a lyrical, unobtrusive style.

 

In 1939, Levitt's noted photograph, Halloween, was included in the Museum of Modern Art's (MoMA) inaugural exhibition for its new photography section. During the same year, her work was published in Fortune magazine. Four years later the MoMA held Levitt's first solo exhibition, titled Helen Levitt: Photographs of Children.

 

Levitt took a job as a film editor in the early 1940s, and soon began working on documentaries and films of her own. In 1948, Levitt was nominated for an Academy Award for The Quiet One, which she wrote and created with Janice Loeb and James Agee. Levitt continued making films for nearly twenty-five years.

 

In 1959 and 1960, Levitt received grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, and returned her focus to still imagery. Levitt was a pioneer in color photography, capturing the innocent, vibrant activity of her beloved New York City streets in dye-transfer color prints.

 

The first major published collection of Levitt's work took place in 1965 in a catalogue called A Way of Seeing. Today there are numerous published collections of her photographs. Levitt received her first national retrospective in 1991, organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, which traveled to major American museums and introduced the nation to one of the most celebrated yet least known photographers in history.

 

The UMFA's exhibition, Helen Levitt Photographs, combines dozens of candid black and white photographs from the 1930s and 1940s, as well as later works, both color prints and gelatin silver prints, from the 1970s and 1980s. Together, these photographs highlight Levitt's astonishing capacity for capturing lyrical and mysterious moments in the everyday life of New York City.

 

For more information, please visit umfa.utah.edu.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks fund. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

Collecting Knowledge: Renaissance Cabinets of Curiosity

January 27-May 15, 2011

 

Salt Lake City- Before the creation of the modern museum, private collections of art pieces, scientific instruments, cultural oddities, and mysterious specimens were housed in rooms or pieces of furniture called cabinets of curiosity. In Renaissance Europe, these cabinets were known as Wunderkammern, or chambers of wonder, and were organized by wealthy collectors to facilitate understanding and give order to the world.

 

The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is pleased to present Collecting Knowledge: Renaissance Cabinets of Curiosity, an exhibition curated by four graduate students from the University of Utah Department of Art and Art History. The exhibition will be on view in the Emma Eccles Jones Education Gallery in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building from January 27 through May 15, 2011.

 

Graduate students Amanda Beardsley, Scotti Hill, Stephanie Hohlios, and Laura Hurtado worked diligently throughout Fall Semester 2010 to quickly organize the exhibition. Supervised by University of Utah professor of art history Sheila Muller and UMFA staff, the students determined thematic elements, intended audience, featured objects, label information, and related programming for the exhibition.

 

"This exhibition has given us the opportunity to collaborate with museum staff and apply museum practices in a way that cannot be duplicated in a classroom," said student Stephanie Hohlios. "For those of us who are pursuing a career in museum work, curating a real exhibition is a rare and invaluable experience."

 

Collecting Knowledge: Renaissance Cabinets of Curiosity examines the people who created cabinets of curiosity, their strategies for classifying and grouping collected items, and how they used knowledge to make sense of their surroundings. The exhibition provides visitors the opportunity to return to the Renaissance model of private study and reflection in a physical space, enabling them to wander, examine, and share the wonder.

 

The exhibition features thirty-six objects from the permanent collection of the UMFA and a rare book from the special collections of the University of Utah J. Willard Marriott Library. Organized in six specific themes, visitors will encounter sixteenth and seventeenth century prints by artists such as Albrecht Dürer, Pieter Bruegel the Elder, and Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn. Exhibition highlights include a sixteenth century Italian cabinet and a display case filled with a variety of objects likely to have been found in a Renaissance cabinet of curiosity: an Asian bell, a Japanese ginger jar, German gemstones, an ivory fetish figure from the Kongo, and more.


"The UMFA strives to be a relevant and inspiring resource for students, faculty, and the community," said Jenny Woods, UMFA campus outreach coordinator. "Collecting Knowledge: Renaissance Cabinets of Curiosity presented an incredible opportunity for the UMFA to collaborate with students and faculty while supporting the University of Utah's academic mission. We hope that this experience was as positive and enriching for the students as it was for us, and that they gained valuable knowledge of the museum world that will guide them in their future endeavors."

 

Public Programming


GALLERY TALKS BY STUDENT CURATORS
February 26, February 27, March 6, and April 23 at 2 pm • FREE with Paid Admission

Gain insight into Collecting Knowledge: Renaissance Cabinets of Curiosity as student curators highlight specific objects and their stories through a series of gallery talks.


THIRD SATURDAY FOR FAMILIES: JOURNAL MAKING
April 16 from 1-4 pm • FREE

Collecting Knowledge: Renaissance Cabinets of Curiosity examines the people who created cabinets of curiosity, classifying and grouping objects to make sense of their world. Use this exhibition for inspiration as you make your own collections journal.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. Admission is $7 adults, $5 seniors and youth ages 6-18, children 5 and under free, UMFA Members free. Free admission is offered on the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks Fund. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

Don Olsen: Abstracts from Nature

December 2010-August 14, 2011

 

Salt Lake City - The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is pleased to present Don Olsen: Abstracts from Nature, an exhibition commemorating the 100th anniversary of the birth of one of the most influential abstract artists to have worked in Utah.

Featuring ten abstracted, large-scale paintings created over a period of twenty-five years, Don Olsen: Abstracts from Nature is now on view in the G. W. Anderson Family Great Hall in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building.

 

Born December 3, 1910, Donald Penrod Olsen (1910-1983) was raised as a musical prodigy. He graduated from the Brigham Young University School of Music in 1935, and spent the next ten years working with the Utah WPA Orchestra and playing first violin with the Salt Lake City Symphony. Olsen's music career ended when he was diagnosed with a throat disorder in 1945, and he refocused his creative energy on a previous interest and talent as an artist.

 

Olsen minored in art during his undergraduate studies at Brigham Young University, and in the early 1950s he continued his art education at the University of Utah. After graduation he became an art instructor at several Utah high schools and at the College of Southern Utah.

 

Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, abstract art was occasionally met with resistance by those uncomfortable with the emerging face of modern art in Utah. While Don Olsen's abstract expressionist paintings were sometimes criticized by local viewers, he received a number of awards for his work, including the Purchase Prize at the Utah State Fair in 1953.

 

In 1954, Olsen moved to Provincetown, Massachusetts to study art under the enigmatic Hans Hoffman, who introduced Olsen to his "push-pull" theory of spatial tension and color relationships in abstract art. A year later, Olsen had a solo exhibition at the Salt Lake Art Center.


Between 1958 and1960, Olsen lost his mother, father, and his wife, resulting in expressively darker, more brooding canvases. He entered a more hopeful phase of life in 1962 when he married his second wife, Betty Olsen, and began yet another ambitious stage of his artistic career. By 1965, the happy couple travelled annually to New York, Boston, and Provincetown to gain access to cutting-edge twentieth century art, and Olsen would return to Utah energized both stylistically and intellectually.


"Don Olsen's early abstract work was hard-edged, grayed out and more controlled than his later work," explains Donna Poulton, UMFA associate curator of the art of Utah and the West. "After he studied with Hans Hoffman, his work evolved to looser, more gestural, and high-keyed expressive compositions. He was concerned with conveying the complexity of emotion in broad, sweeping strokes. For a period during the 70s, Olsen experimented with hard-edged images, often using primary colors directly from the tube. When he was diagnosed with cancer in 1980, he returned to loose, gestural, and more expressive paintings. Throughout his career, Olsen drew from his great intellect and his commitment to explore emotion through color tensions and the plasticity of his medium."


Today, Don Olsen is considered to be one of the most groundbreaking non-objective artists to have worked in Utah.


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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. Admission is $7 adults, $5 seniors and youth ages 6-18, free for children 5 and under, higher education students in Utah, University of Utah students, faculty, staff and UMFA Members. Thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks Fund, free admission is offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 am - 5 pm; Wednesdays 10 am - 8 pm.; Weekends, 11 am - 5 pm; closed Mondays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

salt 2: Sophie Whettnall

November 18, 2010-February 27, 2011

 

Salt Lake City, UT - The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is pleased to present salt 2: Sophie Whettnall, the second in the museum's new series of exhibitions showcasing innovative art from around the world. salt aims to reflect the international impact of contemporary art today, forging local connections to the global, and bringing new and diverse artwork to the city that shares the program's name.


Organized by Jill Dawsey, UMFA acting chief curator and curator of modern and contemporary art, the second salt installation opens on November 18, 2010 and will remain on view through February 27, 2011 in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at the University of Utah. The exhibition will be located in and around a newly designed black box gallery on the UMFA's first floor.

 

Featured artist Sophie Whettnall (b. 1973) will travel from Brussels to Salt Lake City to personally install three works: a video, a video installation, and a large-scale wall drawing. Whettnall works primarily in photography, video, performance, and site-specific installations, yet she is trained as a painter and much of her work takes up landscape, portraiture, and other themes traditionally associated with painting. Across and between mediums, Whettnall's art explores the relationship between the self and its surroundings in a dislocated world.

 

A highlight of salt 2: Sophie Whettnall is Waterfall (2008), an installation that features a video projection in the UMFA's black box gallery. In this work, Whettnall engages the temporal nature of video, creating images that move between stillness and activity. At first glance, Waterfall resembles a still photograph of a frozen waterfall. Upon closer inspection, however, one sees that a river slowly moves in real time at the foot of the falls, enhanced by strange sounds that crackle and echo through the landscape.

 

Whettnall will continue these themes of movement and time with a drawing on the outside wall of the salt 2: Sophie Whettnall gallery. Executed in white pencil on black paint, the untitled drawing may suggest an abstract river, with repeated parallel lines eventually converging in ripples and waves. Resembling a topographical map, this drawing will also record the artist's own gestures as she draws.

 

Another gesture is traced through a third work of art in salt 2: Sophie Whettnall. In the video Over the Sea (2007), viewers follow the determined footsteps of a woman in high heels as she makes her way from an urban space to a quiet spot overlooking the sea. At the conclusion of the video, the camera moves quickly between her heels to rest on the sight of the ocean, highlighting the human figure as a meeting point between nature and culture, public and private, self and surrounds.

 

salt 2: Sophie Whettnall is the artist's first solo exhibition in the United States . Whettnall has had many solo exhibitions throughout Europe, and has been included in numerous group exhibitions in France, Spain, China, Italy, and Belgium. For more information, please visit www.sophiewhettnall.com.

 

The UMFA's salt series affirms the Museum's commitment to the art of today and tomorrow, demonstrating that contemporary art is vital, dynamic, and socially relevant.


Programming


Visiting Artist Talk: A Conversation with Artist Sophie Whettnall
November 18, 2010 at 6 pm

Join Jill Dawsey, UMFA acting chief curator and curator of modern and contemporary art, for a conversation with salt 2 artist, Sophie Whettnall. Learn about Whettnall's artistic practice and philosophy in this free public program, and be among the first to experience salt 2.


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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

 

Trevor Southey: Reconciliation

October 21, 2010 - February 13, 2011


Salt Lake City, UT -
The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) presents Trevor Southey: Reconciliation, a retrospective exhibition of the most significant works from each period of former Utah-based artist Trevor Southey's (b. 1940) career. Organized by guest curator Day Christensen, in collaboration with Donna Poulton, UMFA associate curator of the art of Utah and the West, the exhibition will be on view in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at the University of Utah from October 21, 2010-February 13, 2011.

Two thousand square feet of gallery space on the UMFA's first floor is devoted to Trevor Southey: Reconciliation. The exhibition comprises more than 60 works created over the last 50 years, including oil paintings, sculpture, and works on paper, which collectively create a profoundly biographical body of work.

The exhibition is designed to trace four distinct passages in Southey's life that have defined the essential qualities of his character and art.

The first room in the gallery space explores his youth in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and early art education in England. The second passage focuses on his life as a married, practicing member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and his desire for a utopian lifestyle created around family, farmstead, and art.

Works in the third section reflect Southey's decision to acknowledge his homosexuality in 1982, which was not a repudiation of his previous life, but rather an attempt to acknowledge his own identity. In the final two rooms, Southey's reconciliation of his life decisions are explored through his evolving artistic approach to the human form.

"One of the most striking and endearing qualities of the artist Trevor Southey is his candor and honesty-traits that characterize not only his personality, but are richly reflected in the sculpture, etchings, and paintings in this evocative retrospective," said Donna Poulton.

"The UMFA has been planning Trevor Southey's retrospective exhibition for two years, and we are delighted to present the work of this talented and much-loved artist," said Gretchen Dietrich, executive director of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts. "Southey's art-rooted so deeply in the human figure-is an amazingly rich and lyrical exploration of what it means to be a human being."

Trevor Southey: Reconciliation is generously sponsored by the B.W. Bastian Foundation, Jim Dabakis, Stephen Justesen, Tom McCarthey, and Mary McCarthey, with additional support from Day Christensen, Sam Stewart, Diane Stewart, Alyssa Warnock, John Warnock, and Marva Warnock.

FREE PUBLIC PROGRAMS AND EVENTS

 

Artist Reception
October 21

Meet artist Trevor Southey, enjoy light refreshments, and experience the Trevor Southey: Reconciliation exhibition on opening night at an artist reception. This event is supported in part by the University of Utah Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Resource Center (LGBT) as part of Pride Week. For a full list of Pride Week events, please visit http://www.sa.utah.edu./lgbt/events/Uprideweek.html.

 

Panel Discussion: "Alpine Ideal"
October 21

The UMFA is pleased to present a panel discussion with artists Trevor Southey, Gary E. Smith, Dennis Smith, and Neil Hadlock. These gentlemen will discuss their lives and artwork, focusing on a movement in the 1970s known as the Alpine Ideal.


For more information, please visit http://www.umfa.utah.edu/trevorsouthey_reconciliation or http://www.trevorsouthey.com. A press kit can be downloaded at http://www.umfa.utah.edu/southeypresskit.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. Like the University of Utah, the UMFA strives to be a safe haven for discussion, dialogue, and free expression. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

Yayoi Kusama: Decades

Curator Talk by Jill Dawsey on January 19, 2011 at 6 pm


Salt Lake City, UT - Learn about the fascinating art and life of renowned Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama in a free public lecture by Jill Dawsey, acting chief curator and curator of modern and contemporary art at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA). Presented in conjunction with the current exhibition, Yayoi Kusama: Decades, this lecture will take place in the Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke, Jr. Auditorium in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at the University of Utah on Wednesday, January 19 from 6-7 pm.


About Yayoi Kusama
From innovative Infinity Nets paintings to obsessive sculptures to polka-dot-filled installations and performances, Yayoi Kusama's pioneering work has established her as one of Japan's most important contemporary artists. Over the past five decades, she has used her work as a vehicle for exploring themes of infinity, repetition, identity, and sexuality.

From 1958 to 1973 Kusama lived in New York City, where she became a key figure in the downtown art scene. Kusama became known for her Infinity Nets paintings, which were covered in intricate, lace-like patterns that seemed to expand forever. By the early 1960s, her nets began to cover real objects such as kitchenware, furniture, even entire rooms. As her practice evolved, she incorporated performance into her work, staging events inspired by the countercultural movements of the time.

According to Kusama's own account, she was initially driven to create art as a means of combating a precarious mental illness. At a young age, Kusama began experiencing hallucinations in which insidious patterns covered everything around her, and felt "as if I had begun to self-obliterate, to revolve in the infinity of endless time and the absoluteness of space." Kusama's artistic practice became a means of immobilizing the patterns that taunted her, and she has remained enormously productive in spite of her illness.

Following her return to Japan in the early 1970s, Kusama was largely forgotten in America, but she received renewed attention in the 1990s when a younger generation of artists discovered her expansive and hybrid approach to art making. Today Kusama lives voluntarily in an institution for the mentally ill, yet she continues to produce work prolifically, maintaining a large studio with numerous assistants.


About the Curator Talk
In this free curator talk, Dawsey will discuss Kusama's extraordinary career and legacy. Dawsey will also describe the ways in which Kusama's art is thematically linked to certain facets of her biography, specifically her status as a woman and immigrant-as a "stranger" and "other"-in the western art world of the late 1950s and 1960s.

Presented in conjunction with the current exhibition, Yayoi Kusama: Decades, this lecture will take place in the Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke, Jr. Auditorium in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at the University of Utah on Wednesday, January 19 from 6-7 pm. For more information, please visit www.umfa.utah.edu or www.yayoi-kusama.jp.


About Yayoi Kusama: Decades
Yayoi Kusama: Decades offers a focused presentation of eleven works by the artist, highlighting artistic developments from each decade of her long career. Featuring works on paper, paintings on canvas, and one Compulsion Furniture sculpture, the exhibition will be on view in the UMFA's first-floor galleries through February 13, 2011.


About the UMFA
The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. Admission is $7 adults, $5 seniors and youth ages 6-18, children 5 and under free, UMFA Members free. Free admission is offered on the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks Fund. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit umfa.utah.edu.


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FACES: Selections from the Permanent Collection of Modern and Contemporary Art

On view through February 13, 2011


Salt Lake City, UT-
The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) presents Faces: Selections from the Permanent Collection of Modern and Contemporary Art, now on view through February 13, 2011 in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at the University of Utah. This dynamic installation brings together classic works of Pop art and more recent Pop-inflected works, with a focus on portraiture and the human face.

Located in a gallery on the UMFA's first floor, the installation comprises some thirty-eight works by artists who participated in or were influenced by the Pop art movement. In the 1950s and 1960s, Pop art introduced new subject matter to the artistic sphere, elevating imagery from the common culture and everyday life-including pictures of Hollywood icons and ordinary people alike- to the level of art.

Faces features work by artists Andy Warhol, Alex Katz, Robert Arneson, Larry Rivers, and Chris Johanson. The exhibition opens with never-before-exhibited Polaroid portraits by Andy Warhol, one of the most influential and provocative artists of the twentieth century. The UMFA received these works in 2008 as a gift from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Portraits of the rich and famous-ranging from celebrity icons to unnamed socialites and party-goers-the Polaroids demonstrate Warhol's consistent artistic process, his interest in mass-produced media, and fascination with glamour and fame.

Portraiture takes a variety of forms throughout the Faces exhibition. A series of fourteen screen prints by artist Alex Katz depicts young people in the late 1970s, each image rendered with a sharp, direct focus. Robert Arneson, on the other hand, takes a sardonic approach to rendering his own likeness in Head Bath, a crayon on paper drawing that depicts the artist swimming in his own brain-and Untitled Trophy (Bust of Bob), an earthenware sculpture that takes the form of a diminutive, self-deprecating "trophy."

Faces concludes with a contemporary sculpture by artist Chris Johanson titled This is You (2002). A member of the group of artists dubbed the "Mission School," who emerged in San Francisco in the 1990s , Johanson works in a flat, intentionally naïve style reminiscent of children's drawings. Drawing inspiration from street culture, environmentalism, and graffiti art, This is You utilizes discarded materials, putting pieces of found wood and metal to new use.

Faces: Selections from the Permanent Collection of Modern and Contemporary Art reflects the UMFA's aim to present high-quality exhibitions that feature key works from the permanent collection. The exhibition will remain on view through February 13, 2011. More information is available at umfa.utah.edu.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. Admission is $7 adults, $5 seniors and youth ages 6-18, children 5 and under free, UMFA Members free. Free admission is offered on the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month thanks to the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks Fund. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

The Ideal Landscape at the UMFA



Salt Lake City - Chinese landscape painting, or Shan shui hua, offers a glimpse into the natural harmony between artist, imagination, and environment. The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is pleased to present The Ideal Landscape, an exhibition featuring twelve intricate Chinese scrolls from the museum's permanent collection that date from the Ming Dynasty through the twentieth century. The exhibition will be on display in the UMFA's second-floor LDS Galleria from October 7, 2010-January 9, 2011, and a free public lecture will be provided by University of Utah Professor of Art HIstory Winston Kyan on Wednesday, October 20 at 1 pm.

Chinese landscape painting possesses a rich legacy dating back to the early dynasties. The term Shan shui hua literally means "mountains and water," which are dominant themes in each painting. These landscapes are not simple recreations of what the painter observed in nature, but are idealized scenes in the artist's mind. In creating their work, Chinese landscape artists intended the viewer to be absorbed into the landscape as a means of meditation, as though they could wander the paths, listen to waterfalls, experience the elements, and become part of the scene itself. Yet to create this free and imaginative expression, the artists had to be disciplined, following conventions, styles, and techniques established by previous generations. According to an 18th century Chinese painting manual, a masterwork in Shan shui hua is a paradox: "The most complex scene appears simple; the scene that obeys every method has no method at all."

The Ideal Landscape comprises one scroll dating from the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), one object created during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912), and ten paintings from the twentieth century. The majority of the scrolls are gifts of Dr. Marcus Jacobson, a longtime supporter of the UMFA. Before his death in 2001, Jacobson amassed a sizable collection of twentieth century Chinese paintings, many of which he purchased directly from the artists.

PUBLIC PROGRAMMING


Lecture: "Mountains and Meanings in Chinese Landscape Painting"
Wednesday, October 20, 2010 at 1 pm
UMFA Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke, Jr. Auditorium


The art of landscape painting in China has always balanced the close observation of nature with the abstraction of its representation. This lecture by University of Utah Professor of Art History Winston Kyan will situate the Chinese paintings from the exhibition, The Ideal Landscape, into the broader context of Chinese art and history by examining the shifting significance of mountains from the fourteenth through the twentieth centuries.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

Painting Utah's Mount Olympus

 

Salt Lake City, UT - While not the tallest mountain in the Wasatch Range, Mount Olympus stands today as a familiar and inspiring natural wonder unique to Utah. In the current exhibition, Painting Utah's Mount Olympus, on view in the Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) G.W. Anderson Family Great Hall through November 14, 2010, visitors will encounter large, breathtaking paintings by premier Utah artists, all of whom aim to capture the sublime beauty of our local icon: Mount Olympus.


Organized by Donna Poulton, UMFA Associate Curator of Utah and Western Art, Painting Utah's Mount Olympus comprises works from esteemed private collections in the local area. The featured paintings span roughly 150 years and were created by such artists as Lee Greene Richards, Gilbert Munger, Edwin Deaken, and David Meikle.

 

These painters followed in the footsteps of the early Utah pioneers who bestowed Mount Olympus with the Greek name for "home of the gods." When Brigham Young and his followers settled in the security of the mountain's shadow, they recognized Olympus as a crucial source of necessary minerals, abundant timbers for building, and precious water in a dry land. However, it was when these pioneers traded their picks and plows for pencils and paintbrushes that the true majesty of Mount Olympus came to light. The mountain was then, as it remains today, a source of undeniable artistic inspiration.

 

Artists were not the only residents who held, and continue to hold, a deep admiration for the silent sentinel. Throughout time, the awesome grandeur of Olympus's peak has inspired authors, hikers, geologists, climbers, and adventurers from all walks of life. Many of these Olympus aficionados have shared their thoughts and experiences on a collective, public register located at the mountain's summit.

 

As part of the Painting Utah's Mount Olympus exhibition, the UMFA has compiled a short video (http://bit.ly/9aYjKs) to serve as a visual register of local residents' responses to Mount Olympus, whether or not they have actually climbed it. Looping on a screen next to the large paintings in the Great Hall, this video features the commentary of an award-winning poet who was inspired by the beautiful butte; a former University of Utah student who wrote his thesis on experiencing the mountain through the eyes of an artist; and Caine Alder, a gentleman in his mid-seventies who has climbed Mount Olympus over 425 times in the last fifty years.

 

The UMFA is delighted to celebrate one of our local natural wonders in Painting Utah's Mount Olympus, an exhibition generously sponsored by the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies and Mount Olympus Waters, Inc.

 

PUBLIC PROGRAMMING
"Painting Utah's Mount Olympus" Free Public Lecture
Wednesday, September 15 at 6 pm
Gain insight into the majesty of Mount Olympus in this free public lecture by UMFA Associate Curator of Utah and Western Art Donna Poulton.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia & John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday-Friday: 10 am-5 pm; Wednesdays 10 am-8 pm; weekends, 11 am-5 pm; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

Las Artes de México

 

On view May 6 - September 26, 2010

 

Salt Lake City, UT -The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is pleased to present Las Artes de México, an exhibition celebrating more than 3,500 years of Mexican art, history, and culture. On loan from the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma, this exhibition will be on view in six of the UMFA's first-floor galleries during the summer of 2010.

 

Las Artes de México offers a dynamic look at Mexico's ancient, folk, and modern cultures, showcasing art from many different eras and regions. From ancient Mesoamerican artifacts to groundbreaking twentieth century artworks by modern masters, Las Artes de México examines the rich historical roots that have developed into the country's cultural landscape today.

 

In an effort to provide a meaningful, enjoyable, and educational experience for all visitors, the UMFA has created label text and educational materials in both English and Spanish. A variety of special public programs, family activities, and community collaborations have been scheduled throughout the run of the exhibition.

 

While the nation of Mexico was formally established in 1821, Mexican culture remains a mosaic of traditions that stretch back to antiquity. In the first two Las Artes de México galleries, visitors will encounter an array of alluring objects, including gold jewelry, ceramic vessels, jade carvings, and intricately crafted instruments. More than one dozen Precolumbian cultures are represented, including the Olmec (2500 BCE-300 CE); the Teotihuacan and Mayas (300-900 CE); and the Toltec and Aztec empires (900-1521 CE).

 

Religion was an important part of everyday life in Mesoamerica. From mass human sacrifices to simple votive offerings, the people of ancient Mexico worshipped deities to ensure well-being in life and afterlife. Religious themes are foregrounded in the third Las Artes de México gallery, which explores the power of the jaguar, the importance of divine effigies, and the significance of the sometimes deadly Olmec ballgame.

 

In subsequent galleries, visitors will discover that indigenous practices underwent a dramatic transformation in the sixteenth century. After the Aztecs were defeated in the Spanish invasion (1519--1521), Roman Catholicism became the official religion of the area. Detailed yarn paintings, colonial bultos, and religious retablos illustrate the resultant merging of native mythology with Catholic ideology. This fusion of Indian and Spanish cultures created a range of vibrant traditions that determined much of Mexico's current cultural identity. The fifth Las Artes de México gallery presents twentieth century masks, weavings, and clothing, all of which are deeply rooted in ancient Mexican tradition and ways of life.

 

In the early twentieth century, around the time of the Mexican Revolution, government leaders worked with artists to establish cultural reforms aimed at empowering the Mexican people. A new generation of artists created public artworks, including murals and prints, that celebrated native traditions, Mexican folklore, and the dignity of working people.

 

The final Las Artes de México gallery includes more than 25 paintings and works on paper by modernist artists such as Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, and Rufino Tamayo, as well as Taller de Grafica Popular (People's Print Workshop) founders Leopoldo Mendez, Raul Anguiano, and Alfredo Zalce. These influential artists were driven by a desire for social emancipation, economic change, and cultural revival.

 

Las Artes de México examines over three millennia of tradition and change across the broad spectrum of Mexican art and culture. The exhibition is on view at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts as the final venue in a three-year national tour developed and managed by Smith Kramer Fine Art Services, a company based in Kansas City, Missouri.

 

For more information, please visit umfa.utah.edu/mexico.


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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays.  For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

Community: Eat, Work, Play


Salt Lake City, UT - Big canvases, bold colors, and intriguing ideas are offered in Community: Eat, Work, Play, a collaborative exhibition on view in the Emma Eccles Jones Education Gallery at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts.


During the 2009-2010 school year, first- and sixth-grade students from Lincoln Elementary School in Salt Lake City worked with UMFA Curators of Education and University of Utah Artsbridge Scholars to create large, energetic works inspired by the Mexican muralist movement.


"I wanted my students to take part in the art community not only as an audience but as active participants, as art-makers," says Janelle Wride, Art Specialist at Lincoln Elementary School. "My students are being challenged in art class to think abstractly, to make connections, to work as a class and in small groups, all with the goal of communicating a meaningful message about themselves and their community."

 

Each child was asked to explore themes from their everyday lives and then visually translate their observations onto large canvas panels. They thought about what and how they eat, where their food comes from, the impact that school and work has on their families and community, and what play means in their neighborhoods and homes.


Organized by Megan Hallett, UMFA Curator of Education, the exhibition will include an important participatory component. Visitors to Community: Eat, Work, Play will have the option to express their reactions to the exhibition and related themes on an interactive response wall, using magnetic words and pictures in English and Spanish.


Community: Eat, Work, Play visually demonstrates the influence and impact of Mexican art on Utah schoolchildren, and reflects the UMFA's mission to provide local students with arts education opportunities. The exhibition will be on view at the UMFA from May 6, 2010 through January 9, 2011, and will serve as one of three companion exhibitions to Las Artes de México, an exhibition on view at the UMFA during the summer of 2010.


On loan from the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Las Artes de México celebrates the art, history, and culture of Mexico through ancient Mesoamerican artifacts and twentieth century works by Diego Rivera and other modern masters. All labels and information in Las Artes de México, Community: Eat, Work, Play, and the two additional companion exhibitions will be available in both English and Spanish to better meet the needs of Museum visitors.


Programming
Third Saturday Art Activity for Families: T-shirts
Saturday, May 15 from 2-4 pm
Join us in celebrating the children's work on view in Community: Eat, Work, Play, and then be inspired to create an art project of your own.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

 

 

salt 1: Adriana Lara

 

Salt Lake City, UT - This spring, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts will inaugurate salt, a series of semiannual exhibitions showcasing innovative contemporary art from around the world. salt aims to reflect the international impact of contemporary art today, forging local connections to the global, and bringing new and diverse artwork to the city that shares the program's name.

 

Organized by Dr. Jill Dawsey, UMFA Acting Chief Curator/Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, the first presentation of salt will debut on May 6 and remain on view through September 26, 2010. salt 1 features the work of Mexico City-based artist Adriana Lara, who works in a range of formats and mediums, creating playful, concept-driven installations. Lara's provocative work often explores the relationship between art-making and other more commonplace forms of production, questioning the boundaries that separate "high art" from everyday objects.

 

Lara has had solo exhibitions at Artpace San Antonio in San Antonio, Texas (2009); Gaga Arte Contemporaneo in Mexico City (2008); Galeria Comercial in San Juan, Puerto Rico (2007); Air de Paris in Paris, France (2007); and the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, France (2003). Her work was recently featured in The Generational: Younger than Jesus at the New Museum in New York City and she has been included in group exhibitions in Berlin, San Juan, New York City, and Paris. Lara is part of numerous collective art projects, such as Pazmaker, a free-distribution quarterly publication for which she is the chief editor, Lasser Moderna, an experimental music band, and "Perros Negros," an "art production office" that proposes new platforms for discussion and art-making.


salt 1: Adriana Lara will be presented in conjunction with the exhibition Las Artes de México, on view in the UMFA's first floor galleries during the summer of 2010. On loan from the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Las Artes de México explores the art, history, and culture of Mexico through an array of artworks, from ancient Mesoamerican artifacts to twentieth century masterworks by Diego Rivera and others. salt 1: Adriana Lara will be on view in a gallery situated at the conclusion of Las Artes de México, allowing viewers to fast-forward to the present moment and experience the cutting-edge art being created in Mexico today.

 

The UMFA's salt series will affirm the Museum's commitment to the art of today and tomorrow, demonstrating that contemporary art is vital, dynamic, and socially relevant.

 

Programming


Artist Talk: A Conversation with Artist Adriana Lara
May 6, 2010 at 7 pm
Join Dr. Jill Dawsey, UMFA Acting Chief Curator/Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, for a conversation with salt 1 artist, Adriana Lara. Learn about Lara's artistic practice and philosophy in this free public program, and be among the first to experience salt 1.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

Pablo O'Higgins: Works on Paper

 

Salt Lake City, UT - The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is pleased to present Pablo O'Higgins: Works on Paper, an exhibition of lithographs by an artist who - though virtually unknown in his home state of Utah - is widely celebrated throughout Mexico.

 

Born in Salt Lake City in 1904, Paul Higgins studied under acclaimed local artists, James T. Harwood and LeConte Stewart at East High School. By the age of twenty, the gifted art student had moved to Mexico City, changed his name to Pablo Esteban O'Higgins, and secured a position as a mural assistant for the famed Mexican muralist, Diego Rivera.

 

O'Higgins joined the Communist Party in Mexico and never spoke of his bourgeois childhood in Utah, nor of his father's role as the sentencing judge in the controversial death of union organizer, Joe Hill, in 1915. Biographers have speculated that O'Higgins's political views and lifelong commitment to social justice were reactions to injustices he observed during his childhood.

 

After assisting Rivera on several mural projects, O'Higgins made the decision to leave and create his own work. He continued to live in Mexico where he founded the anti-Fascist printmaking workshop, Taller de Grafica Popular (People's Graphic Workshop), with artist and political activist, Leopoldo Mendez, in 1937. The Taller de Grafica Popular was created to promote the graphic arts, enabling the widespread distribution of politically inspired images to often-illiterate audiences.

 

O'Higgins became an official citizen of Mexico in 1961. The only non-native Mexican whose work was included in the New York MoMA's 1940 exhibition, Twenty Centuries of Mexican Art, his work was exhibited to wide acclaim in Mexico, the United States, and Europe throughout the remainder of his life. O'Higgins died in Mexico City in 1983, and El Palacio de Bellas Artes held a funeral in his honor.

 

Pablo O'Higgins: Works on Paper offers a focused look at O'Higgins's sustained commitment to Mexico's working class and their struggle for emancipation. The exhibition consists of twenty-six lithographs from local private collections, all of which feature heroic depictions of Mexican laborers.

 

Organized by Donna Poulton, Associate Curator of Utah and Western Art, Pablo O'Higgins: Works on Paper is the first of four exhibitions at the UMFA that will celebrate the art and culture of Mexico in 2010.

 

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

The Continuing Allure

 

Salt Lake City, UT - The vast deserts and mesmerizing canyon regions of southern Utah have inspired filmmakers, poets, and artists for over 160 years. In the exhibition, The Continuing Allure: Painters of Utah's Red Rock, on view in the Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) G.W. Anderson Family Great Hall from January 14 through June 27, 2010, visitors will encounter large, breathtaking paintings by some of the West's premier artists.

 

Organized by Donna Poulton, UMFA Associate Curator of Utah and Western Art, The Continuing Allure comprises works from private regional collections and the UMFA's permanent collection. The featured paintings span roughly a century, and were created by such artists as William R. Leigh, Sven Birger Sandzen, and Gary E. Smith. Also included are the "California painters," namely Edgar Payne, Maynard Dixon, Harold "Buck" Weaver, and Conrad Buff.

 

Each of these artists traveled to southern Utah, often staying for weeks or months at a time, to paint the cubed buttes and towering spires found in the great iconic sites of the West: Bryce, Zion, Rainbow Bridge, and the Grand Staircase. While most of the paintings in The Continuing Allure are representational in style, each artist strove to create, in his own way, an authentic American experience, capturing and interpreting the challenging terrain with innovative methods.

 

Featured artist, William R. Leigh, is a classic example of an adventurous painter who became enamored with the rhythmic canyons and imposing rock faces of southern Utah. Originally from New York, Leigh traveled to Arizona in 1906 to paint scenes of the Grand Canyon for the Santa Fe Railroad, and he spent nearly every summer thereafter painting in New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah. In 1922, Leigh embarked on a treacherous week-long trip to the steep, slick rock mass of Rainbow Bridge. It was there that he painted Rainbow Bridge by Moonlight, one of the works currently on view in The Continuing Allure.

 

Nearly a century later, artists like Charles Muench are still embracing and conquering the obstacles of Utah's red rock region. Following a long tradition of highly regarded artists, Muench regularly packs his paint and canvases to spend weeks in Bryce and Zion National Parks. Visitors to the exhibition can see Bryce Canyon Color (2000), in which Muench captured the colorful canyon at twilight, carefully shaping the thousands of hoodoos and spires that fill the geological amphitheater.


The UMFA is delighted to present The Continuing Allure: Painters of Utah's Red Rock, which coincides with the celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the creation of Zion and Bryce National Monuments (now National Parks) in 1909 and 1910.

 

PUBLIC PROGRAMMING

"When the Movies Raised Kane in Kane County: Hollywood Moviemaking in Utah," by Dr. James V. D'Arc
Wednesday, March 24 at 7 pm.
The famous movie director John Ford once exclaimed, "...Monument Valley was my greatest star." In this lecture by noted film historian and expert, Dr. James D'Arc, you can discover the familiar sites that inspired many classic cinematic moments and productions throughout 100 years of filmmaking in the Utah red rock.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. General admission is $7 adults, $5 youth and seniors, FREE for U of U students/staff/faculty, UMFA members, higher education students in Utah, and children under six years old. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tue - Fri: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wed 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Sat & Sun, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

Influences of the Silk Road


Salt Lake City - What do jade, chess, horses and Hinduism have in common? Come to the Utah Museum of Fine Arts to find out! The UMFA is pleased to present Influences of the Silk Road, a new exhibition on view from November 5, 2009 - April 25, 2010 in the Emma Eccles Jones Education Gallery. This alluring exhibition highlights images from the Museum's permanent collection that reflect the religions, technologies, and goods that were exchanged en route, or may have even traveled on the Silk Road themselves.

 

The Silk Road was a complex web of overland and maritime trade routes that linked Asia, the Middle East, and Europe from the first millennium BCE through the second millennium CE. The land routes were used extensively through the 1400s, and were complemented in the medieval period by sea routes. The length, cultural diversity, and political complexity of the Silk Road resulted in multi-directional trade, and while very few people traveled the entire route, the spread of goods and ideas went far beyond the established course.

 

To bring Influences of the Silk Road to fruition, the UMFA partnered with faculty members from the University of Utah Middle East Center and Department of Asian Studies. Together they identified roughly thirty objects from the permanent collection that were representative of exchange along the routes, including: materials and goods, such as a Kyrgyz saddle and an Ishaandy leopard skin hat; technologies and ideas, including a Korean printing block and Chinese umbrellas; religions, represented by objects like a 5th century Byzantine cross, Hindu deity figure, and Islamic Hadith; and globalization, characterized by an English tea pot and German oil painting.

 

Influences of the Silk Road aims to make learning about this crucial time in history fun for visitors of all ages. Families and students will enjoy a treasure hunt through the exhibition and other galleries, and get educational insight through an easy-to-use audio tour. Visitors will also have the opportunity to test their skills in a game of chess, learn to use a camera obscura and abacus, and test a variety of spices in a Silk Road sniff station.

 

Patrons interested in a more in-depth experience before or after their visit can explore the Silk Road through a virtual exhibition at umfa.utah.edu/silkroad. This online program showcases images and information about some of the objects in the exhibition, tells the story of dangerous journeys made by Silk Road explorers, links to an illuminated 18th century Qur'an from the collection of the University of Utah Marriott Library, and much more.

 

Embark on your journey today!

 

FREE PUBLIC PROGRAMMING

 

Artful Afternoon: Chinese New Year
Saturday, February 20, 2010 from 1-4 pm
The Utah Museum of Fine Arts and University of Utah Confucius Institute are pleased to present a free afternoon devoted entirely to art, culture, family, and fun! Each year the UMFA hosts an Artful Afternoon event inspired by a current exhibition or collection, and this year we're celebrating Chinese New Year and the Influences of the Silk Road exhibition with children's art workshops, performances, treasure hunts, and creative activities. Come celebrate the year of the tiger at the UMFA!

 

Influences of the Silk Road Lecture Series
Spring 2010 - TBA
Gain insight into the exhibition Influences of the Silk Road through a free lecture series by local experts. Check our website for dates and details.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive. Admission is $7 adults, $5 seniors and youth ages 6-18, free for children 5 and under, University of Utah students, faculty, staff, higher education students in Utah, and UMFA Members. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tue - Fri 10 am - 5 pm, Wed 10 am - 8 pm, Weekends 11 am - 5 pm; closed Mondays and Holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

DESERT SECRETS

October 8, 2009-January 31, 2010

 


Salt Lake City, UT- The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is pleased to present Desert Secrets: Photography From the Permanent Collection, a provocative new exhibition that explores the Southwestern desert as a place of strangeness and the unknown. On view through January 31, 2010, the installation highlights the work of seven contemporary photographers who seek to reveal what is hidden in barren and seemingly uninhabited landscapes.

 

On view in the Museum's upstairs LDS Galleria, the photographs in Desert Secrets examine themes of technological intrusions into the land; atomic testing; clandestine military operations; conspiracy theories; and the inherently surreal nature of the desert landscape itself.

 

Five large-scale photographs by acclaimed emerging artist Trevor Paglen are central to the exhibition. A photographer, writer, and self-described "experimental geographer," Paglen has received accolades from both the art world and mainstream media for his deliberate blurring of disciplinary boundaries between art, social science, and politics. Using special equipment designed for photographing outer space, Paglen creates images of classified military sites-so called "black sites"-that are often hidden behind many miles of restricted land. His work raises challenging questions about the known and the unknown, the visible and the invisible.

 

The exhibition also includes a large selection of works by photographer Patrick Nagatani. A New Mexico resident, Nagatani often uses the local landscape as a stage for scenes that comment wryly on the atomic history and nuclear industry of the area. Drawing on his background in movie set design, Nagatani creates and photographs elaborate installations that combine life-size foam-board cutouts, handcrafted miniature models, paint and collage elements. The resultant images amount to a kind of theater of the absurd, questioning the frequent clash between human culture and scientific advancement.

 

Nagatani's photographic series Nuclear Enchantment can be explored in its entirety in the UMFA's new virtual exhibition, which can be accessed at umfa.utah.edu/patricknagatani. Presented in conjunction with Desert Secrets, this online component features a timeline of nuclear development, a Google Maps tour of the sites depicted in Nagatani's photographs, and short videos that illuminate the compelling history and complex techniques behind his work.

 

DESERT SECRETS PUBLIC PROGRAMS

 

Desert Secrets Film Series: Them!
September 30 at 6 pm in the UMFA Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke Jr. Auditorium

In this Cold War-era "nuclear monster" movie, atomic tests in the New Mexico desert result in the growth of giant mutant ants. Directed by Gordon Douglas (1954), this film is not rated.

 

Visiting Artist Talk: Trevor Paglen
October 8 at 7 pm in the UMFA Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke Jr. Auditorium
FREE TO THE PUBLIC

The UMFA is pleased to welcome photographer, writer, artist, and self-described "experimental geographer" Trevor Paglen for a free artist talk. Paglen has received accolades and attention from the art world as well as the mainstream media for his deliberate blurring of the boundaries between contemporary art, social science and politics. His diverse appeal even landed him an appearance on Comedy Central's The Colbert Report. With four of his photographs featured in the Desert Secrets exhibition, Trevor Paglen will provide insight into his artistic philosophies.

 

Desert Secrets Film Series: The Man Who Fell to Earth with guest James Poulton
October 31 at 2 pm in the UMFA Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke Jr. Auditorium

Directed by Nicolas Rogg, this extraterrestrial film is loosely based on the book of the same title by Walter Tevis. Thomas Jerome Newton, a humanoid alien, comes to Earth in an attempt to bring water back to his dry planet. Financing his plan by becoming a prolific and wealthy inventor and businessman, Newton is sidetracked when he falls for a pretty girl in New Mexico and learns about the vices and virtues of human existence. A cult classic notable for performances by David Bowie, Candy Clark and Rip Torn, as well as its surreal imagery. Following the film, musician and psychologist Dr. James Poulton will participate in a brief discussion. This film is rated "R."

 

Desert Secrets Film Series: Zabriskie Point
November 14 at 2 pm in the UMFA Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke Jr. Auditorium

Originally a box office failure and financial fiasco, Zabriskie Point attempted a grandiose statement on 1960s American society through intense images and an eclectic soundtrack. With the criticism and politics that plagued its release in the past, the film can be viewed as a fascinating period portrayal of parts of the 1960s counterculture movement in America, while placing emphasis on the haunting landscape of Zabriskie Point in Death Valley, California. This film is rated "R."


Desert Secrets Film Series: Gerry
December 9 at 6 pm in the UMFA Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke Jr. Auditorium

In this daring film, Gus Van Sant explores themes of friendship and personal tribulations set in the vast desert landscape. When two young men get lost in the desert during a road trip, their friendship and wits are pushed to their limits. Replete with intense long shots pitting the actors against ever-changing yet barren landscapes, this film explores the human relationship to the surreal desert environment. This film is rated "R."

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. Admission is $7 adults, $5 seniors and youth ages 6-18, children 5 and under free, UMFA Members free, U students/staff/faculty free, Higher Education Students in Utah free. Free admission is offered on the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit umfa.utah.edu.

 

Africa: Arts of a Continent

 

Salt Lake City, UT- The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is pleased to announce the return of its African art collection to the galleries after a three-year hiatus. On view beginning October 15, 2009, the dynamic installation, Africa: Arts of a Continent will present both ancient Egyptian objects and early twentieth century African tribal art.

 

Located in the Museum's first-floor galleries, Africa: Arts of a Continent opens with one of the UMFA's newest and never-before-seen acquisition: a late XXVI Dynasty (664-525 BCE) sarcophagus. When this ancient object arrived at the Museum in last September, its former occupant's identity was unknown. To solve this mystery, the UMFA consulted John H. Taylor, Assistant Keeper of Ancient Egypt and Sudan at the British Museum, who was able to translate two strands of hieroglyphs on the front of the sarcophagus. Taylor determined that the occupant was an Egyptian man named Padiusir, which means "He who Osiris has given." The black and yellow sarcophagus is richly decorated with symbolic religious scenes and elaborate incantations, all meant to protect Padiusir's Ka, or spiritual double, in the afterlife.

 

Themes of burial and the underworld resonate throughout the first gallery, which includes amulets that were placed in linen wrappings during mummification, cosmetic jars created as necessary tomb furnishings, and statues of important deities to accompany the ka.

 

The majority of these objects came to the Museum as gifts from the Natacha Rambova Collection of Egyptian Antiquities. Most famously remembered as the ballerina and costume designer who married Rudolph Valentino, Rambova (1897-1966) was fascinated by mythology, symbolism, and art history. She studied Egyptology in earnest, made several trips to the country in her lifetime, and even received a grant in 1946 to analyze symbolic material in Egypt. Her research left an important, if under-recognized mark on the field of Egyptology.

 

In the 1950s, Rambova's mother, Winifred Hudnut, began donating items to the University of Utah, many of which form part of the UMFA's permanent collection today. In 1952, Rambova followed her mother's example, donating some of her own Egyptian artifacts to the Museum. Upon her death, the Egyptian art objects from her private collection were bequeathed to the Utah Museum of Fine Arts.

 

The artifacts from Rambova's collection reflect her rigorous search to find shared meaning in ancient symbols, her reverence for mystical beliefs, and her desire to collect items of beauty.

 

These themes carry through the following galleries of the Africa: Arts of a Continent installation, with art objects from diverse African tribes organized around three pertinent themes: "Beauty All Around," "The Many Faces of Masks," and "Mystery and Magic: Seeking Knowledge from the Gods and Ancestors."

 

From everyday objects that hold symbolic and utilitarian value, to fetishes believed to hold spiritual power, to beautiful royal masks worn by kings in tribal ceremonies, this section of African art invites the visitor to compare ancient objects with more recent artifacts. The more modern twentieth-century objects emphasize the continuing vitality of African art, contextualized within their cruicial cultural and religious meanings. Visitors will learn about the nkisi spiritual tool, the Akua'Ba fertility figure, the importance of the demon-devouring deity, Goli, and much more.

 

Explore beauty, mystery, and masquerade in Africa: Arts of a Continent!

 

PUBLIC PROGRAMMING

 

Third Saturday for Families: Making Masks
October 17, 2009 from 2 - 4 pm in the UMFA Emma Eccles Jones Education Center
FREE TO THE PUBLIC
Join us this Third Saturday for our mask-making activity for families. Find inspiration in our new Africa; Arts of a Continent exhibition and then decorate your own mask to take home.

 

Adult Class: Enigmatic Egypt
October 21 and 28, 2009 from 6 - 8 pm in the UMFA Emma Eccles Jones Education Center
Sign up for this adult class today! Taught by former UMFA Curator Bernadette Brown, this class will help you discover the culture of ancient Egypt as revealed by its art and artifacts. Explore the origin of religion in Egypt, rituals of death and preparation for the afterlife, mythology, oral traditions and more. A portion of each class will be spent in the UMFA's new Africa: Arts of a Continent exhibition. Co-sponsored by Academic Outreach and Continuing Education. SLC FEE: $49, UMFA members pay $44 (ask for 002). Call U of U Lifelong Learning 801.587.5433 to register.

 

Teacher Workshop: The View from the Pyramids
October 24, 2009 from 9 am - 3 pm at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts
FREE TO THE PUBLIC
The University of Utah's Middle East Center Outreach Program and the Utah Museum of Fine Arts are proud to sponsor a workshop that will look at the country of Egypt: its culture and customs, history and legacy. Teachers, high school students, middle school students and anyone interested in the topic are invited to attend. There is no charge for but registration but it is required as space is limited. To register, call the Middle East Center at 801-581-5003.

 

Family Backpacks
Available at the front desk in November
FREE FOR CHECKOUT AT THE FRONT DESK
Families can have an adventure in Africa: Arts of a Continent with two new family backpacks! Children and their parents can learn about the art and culture of Egypt and Africa through games, puzzles, art activities and musical instruments. Family backpacks are free with paid admission.

 

African Film Festival Traveling Series
February in the UMFA Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke, Auditorium
FREE TO THE PUBLIC
Celebrate Black History Month and the Africa: Arts of a Continent exhibition by attending one or more of our free films! The UMFA is pleased to participate in the 2009-2010 African Film Festival Traveling Series from New York City. Don't miss five free screenings of the contemporary short films: Nora, Movement (R)Evolution Africa, Area Boys, Bronx Princess, and Coming of Age. In addition, the UMFA will present four feature-length contemporary films, including From a Whisper, In My Genes, Wrestling Grounds/L'Appel des Arenes, and Sex, Okra and Salted Butter. Check our website, umfa.utah.edu, for more information.

 


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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. Admission is $7 adults, $5 seniors and youth ages 6-18, children 5 and under free, UMFA Members free, U of U students, staff, and faculty free, higher education students in Utah free. Free admission is offered on the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

 

Then & Now

 

Salt Lake City, UT- The Utah Museum of Fine Arts presents Then & Now: Selections from the Permanent Collection of Modern and Contemporary Art, on view through September 4, 2009. This dynamic installation traces the varied paths of contemporary art since the 1960s, drawing parallels between the past and present.


Located in the Museum's first floor galleries, the installation is structured in roughly chronological order, with each gallery focusing on key developments in late twentieth century art: from Minimalism of the 1960s to the return to realist painting in the 1970s, from Robert Smithson's meditations on human intrusions into nature to Pop and Post-minimalist artists who grappled with the realities of a war-torn world. Then & Now explores how these artistic impulses both respond to earlier movements and shape and inform subsequent developments in contemporary art.


The exhibition opens with the UMFA's newest acquisition, a large-scale wooden sculpture entitled Fermator by pioneering Minimalist artist Carl Andre. Constructed with unpretentious materials, the sculpture sits not on a pedestal but directly on the floor of the gallery, occupying the same space as its viewers. Fermator was purchased with funds from the UMFA's Wattis Endowment for Twentieth Century Art, an endowment restricted solely for the purchase of artworks created for the Museum by the late philanthropist Phyllis Wattis (1905-2002), a Salt Lake-native and a great granddaughter of Brigham Young. The UMFA's acquisition of Carl Andre's sculpture reflects the spirit and vision of Wattis, who championed the work of Minimalist and Conceptual artists of the 1960s and 70s. Her significant contributions and gifts to fine arts and performing arts organizations in the Bay Area, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMoMA), the de Young Museum, San Francisco Symphony, and San Francisco Opera, helped to shape San Francisco into one of the most rich and cutting-edge art communities existing today.

 

In 1976, Wattis was instrumental in the UMFA's acquisition of Sylvia Plimack Mangold's 1970 painting Floor with Laundry #1, a significant work in the Then & Now exhibition that has received renewed attention through its inclusion in the groundbreaking exhibition WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution, organized by The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles in 2007. Plimack Mangold's insistently realistic painting revels in the observation of everyday life, elevating a mere pile of laundry to the level of high art.

 

Then & Now concludes with a special presentation of a video by the Turner Prize-nominated British artist Phil Collins. Entitled baghdad screentests, Collins's video was filmed in Iraq's capital in 2002 just prior to the American-led invasion. The piece references Andy Warhol's legendary 1960s Screen Tests, the short films Warhol made of anyone the artist thought had "star" potential. Collins's video portraits of young Iraqis, many of whom are university students, are accompanied by a soundtrack of the artist's favorite pop love songs. The portraits serve as counterpoints to Western stereotypes about people whose faces rarely appear on the evening news. After six years, the war continues, and Collins's video continues to resonate.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. Admission is $7 adults, $5 seniors and youth ages 6-18, children 5 and under free, UMFA Members free. Free admission is offered on the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit umfa.utah.edu.

 

Splendid Heritage: Perspectives on American Indian Art

 

Salt Lake City, UT- This February, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts will premiere the landmark exhibition, Splendid Heritage: Perspectives on American Indian Art. Featuring 145 objects of unique artistry and powerful cultural expression, this world-class show presents a wealth of early Plains, Plateau, and Northeastern American Indian material from the private collection of John and Marva Warnock.

 

Visitors to Splendid Heritage will encounter 18th and 19th century American Indian objects of unparalleled beauty and craftsmanship, including beaded tobacco bags, weapons, dolls, cradles, war shirts, dresses, moccasins and more - a majority of which have never been on public view prior to this exhibition.

 

Splendid Heritage will examine the American Indian objects as both works of art and cultural artifacts, bringing to light the fascinating intersection of culture and art. Emma Hansen, senior curator of the Plains Indian Museum at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center, and Bernadette Brown, curator of African, Oceanic and New World Art at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts have collaborated to help visitors connect the cultural and fine arts perspectives of the objects featured in the exhibition.

 

"All of the objects in the exhibition illustrate how items of daily use can be elevated from mere utility to breathtaking examples of artistic skill and vision," said Bernadette Brown. "Among the many masterworks are a Man's Shirt from ca. 1860, with its exquisite wrapped quill design in iridescent yellow, red and blue; a Cradle made ca. 1860, which demonstrates the artistry of American Indian women; and a Pipe Bag created around 1875 that serves as a superb example of pictographic beadwork."

 

As co-curator Emma Hansen explains, "In addition to their intrinsic artistry and creativity, such works are powerful and often multi-layered expressions of cultural knowledge, biographical and historical experiences, and a spirituality that guides all aspects of the artists' lives."

 

Visitors of all ages will enjoy the innovative and engaging presentation of objects in Splendid Heritage and learn more about them in a variety of fun ways:

 

• A touch-screen kiosk offers a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the collection
• Interactive lift panels contain questions and answers for a younger audience
• A make-and-take table gives visitors the opportunity to create their own parfleche case
• Hands-on activity stations allow visitors to manipulate materials and learn about the artistic techniques of American Indians
Splendid Heritage Family Backpacks, available for checkout at the front desk, explore the horse culture of the Plains Indians
• A creative gallery guide will help families navigate through the exhibition
• MP3 players, complete with curatorial interviews, will be available for checkout.

 

In addition, a variety of engaging public programs have been organized throughout the run of the exhibition to help children and adults learn more about the Plains, Plateau and Northeastern American Indians. Planned programming includes a Wednesday lecture series, a fascinating film series, art classes, family and community events, and an evening for educators. Most of the Splendid Heritage programming is free of charge. For more information please visit www.umfa.utah.edu or contact the Museum's education department at 801-581-3580.

 

The Splendid Heritage exhibition is presented as an educational project in conjunction with We Shall Remain, an ambitious television series created by KUED. We Shall Remain offers insight into the extraordinary world of Utah's five tribes-the Paiute, Ute, Navajo, Goshute and Northern Shoshone-in five 30-minute documentaries. The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is pleased to contribute to the efforts of the We Shall Remain community coalition by providing the public with a greater understanding and appreciation of the art and culture of American Indians.

 

When Splendid Heritage ends its premiere run at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts in January 2010, the exhibition will embark on a multi-year national tour.

 

A beautiful 250 page, full-color Splendid Heritage catalogue published by the University of Utah Press will be available for sale in The Museum Store.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive. General admission is $5 adults, $3 seniors and youth ages 6-18, free for children 5 and under, University of Utah students, faculty, staff and UMFA Members. **Admission prices are subject to change; please visit our website for updated rates. Free admission offered the third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tue - Fri 10 am - 5 pm, Wed 10 am - 8 pm, Weekends 11 am - 5 pm; closed Mondays and Holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

Karl Bodmer: Beyond the Frontier

February 27 - June 21, 2009

 

Salt Lake City, UT - Discover the new nation of America as experienced by European explorers in the exhibition, Karl Bodmer: Beyond the Frontier, on view at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts through June 21, 2009. Featuring an original copy of the 1839 journal, Travels in the Interior of North America, and more than 30 large aquatint engravings by artist and adventurer Karl Bodmer, this exhibition visually documents an important nineteenth century exploration of the American West.

 

"Karl Bodmer: Beyond the Frontier investigates the work of a Swiss painter during his exploration of the western United States with the German naturalist Prince Maximilian of Neuweid," explains historian James Swensen. "Their journey, which took place from 1832-1834, was to be one of discovery and documentation as they worked among the Mandan, Crow, and other American Indian tribes. Along with Splendid Heritage, this exhibition provides an insightful glimpse into their travels as well as the rich lives of Native Americans then living along the Missouri River."

 

On May 7, 1832, Maximilian and Bodmer embarked on a 28-month exploration of the undocumented continent, determined to study and accurately record the animals, landscapes, and Native cultures of New World before they were lost to European settlement. The two men traveled along the courses of the Ohio, Mississippi and Missouri Rivers to the remote Indian territories of present-day Montana, repeating much of the same voyage made decades earlier by Lewis and Clark.

 

Through a multitude of detailed sketches, drawings and portraits, Bodmer visually recorded the environments, cultures, and people he encountered. His aquatint engravings depict ceremonial dances, Mandan medicine sites, Assiniboine tombs, American Indian tools, fantastic landscapes and wildlife.

 

After concluding their journey in 1834, Maximilian selected more than 80 of Bodmer's works to include in his journal, Travels in the Interior of North America, published in 1839. Combining Maximilian's detailed diaries with Bodmer's visual documentation, this book conformed in many ways to the narrow but pervasive belief in the "noble savage"–a prominent Western idea in the 18th and 19th century which condescendingly stereotyped and idealized American Indians. The journal had an enormous influence on the European view of American Indian people, and became increasingly important after the smallpox epidemic of 1837 decimated the American Indian population and culture.

 

Despite a lengthy and distinguished career, Bodmer is most often remembered for these works produced in the American West, "beyond the frontier." Visitors to the UMFA will have the opportunity to see more than 30 of his aquatint engravings in Karl Bodmer: Beyond the Frontier, as well as reproductions of his work in the current exhibition, Splendid Heritage: Perspectives on American Indian Art.

 


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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive. General admission is: Adults $7, Youth and Seniors $5, Children under 6 FREE, U of U students, staff and faculty FREE, UMFA Members FREE. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tue - Fri 10 am - 5 pm, Wed 10 am - 8 pm, Weekends 11 am - 5 pm; closed Mondays and Holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

An Innermost Journey

October 29, 2008-February 15, 2009

 

The Art of Shauna Cook Clinger

 

Salt Lake City, UT - Join the Utah Museum of Fine Arts this fall for a survey and celebration of Utah artist Shauna Cook Clinger's exceptional career and artwork. An Innermost Journey, on view from October 29, 2008 - February 15, 2009, will showcase many of the artist's large scale paintings created over the last thirty years.

 

The new exhibition will be comprised of two parts: the "outer focus" of commissioned portraits and the "inner focus" of symbolic self-portraits. The "outer focus" portraits display Clinger's innate ability to capture the essence and personality of her subjects as she brings them to life on the canvas. The "inner focus" paintings reflect Clinger's inward journey to self-discovery. Emotionally honest and powerfully rendered, these symbolic self-portraits serve as artistic confessions to her spiritual struggle, exploration, and ultimate rebirth while challenging the conventional nature of portraiture.

 

Accompanying An Innermost Journey is a full-color exhibition catalog, published with the support of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts and Salt Lake City Arts Council. Clinger's works featured in this exhibition and exhibition catalog are multi-layered pieces that exceed boundaries of content and style. Her frequent shifts between academic realism and audacious abstraction mimic the constant blending of body and spirit in her art. Unapologetic, psychological, personal and egalitarian, the artwork in An Innermost Journey is at once a private and universal expression. Don't miss this exhibition!

 

Artist Bio:

A sixth generation Utahan, Clinger is one of the state's most prominent artists. Her works have been exhibited in public institutions throughout the United States, including the National Museum for Women in the Arts in Washington D.C., and she has received numerous awards such as the Utah Lieutenant Governor's Outstanding Artist Award in 2002. Clinger's paintings can also be found in a variety of museum, public, corporate and private collections, including the New York City Public Library, Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Museum of Church History and Art, State of Utah Collections, Springville Museum of Art, University of Utah, Brigham Young University-Idaho, and Utah State University.


At age seventeen Clinger received the four-year Edwin Evans Presidential Art Scholarship to the University of Utah, where she was mentored by classically trained English portrait artist Alvin Gittins. After graduating with honors in 1976, Clinger continued her graduate work with Gittins at Brigham Young University School of Visual Arts. After Clinger concluded her studies in 1979, her talent and reputation soon generated a five-year waiting list for her portraiture. Some of her major commissions include the official portraits of President Joseph Fielding Smith (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) and President Chase N. Peterson (University of Utah).

 

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. Admission is $5 adults, $3 seniors and youth ages 6-18, children 5 and under free, UMFA Members free. Museum hours are Tuesday - Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Weekends,
11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; closed Mondays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

Art Since 1960

October 11, 2008 – February 8, 2009

 

Salt Lake City, UT–The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is pleased to present an array of innovative works of modern and contemporary art from its permanent collection in the new installation, Art Since 1960, on view October 11, 2008 through February 8, 2009. The exhibition invites visitors to trace the succession of diverse movements and styles that have unfolded in art over the last five decades.


Art Since 1960 offers a fresh interpretation of key works from the UMFA's holdings and features numerous works that have never before been on display. The installation includes a concentration of works by Pop artists such as Andy Warhol, James Rosenquist, Alex Katz, Claes Oldenburg, and Roy Lichtenstein. Other highlights include recent Museum acquisitions including Buried Angel (1962), an early painting by Robert Smithson, Ingrid Calame's #233 Drawing (2006), and Suling Wang's abstract painting Untitled (2005). Also featured are works by Robert Rauschenberg, Bruce Nauman, Gerhard Richter, Lyle Ashton Harris, and Renee Greene.


The 1960s was a decade that saw sweeping changes in society and politics as well as within the realm of art. In the early 1960s, Pop Art introduced radically new subject matter, elevating commonplace objects and commercial culture to the level of art. Andy Warhol, for example, used his photo-screen printing process to depict popular American icons, while Roy Lichtenstein adopted the Ben Day dot pattern of comic books and newsprint. Artists in the later 1960s and 1970s responded to pressing social and political concerns, as evidenced in James Rosenquist's F-111 (1974), which juxtaposes scenes of American prosperity with military imagery, and Bruce Nauman's text-based piece, Raw/War (1971). Such works continue to resonate powerfully in our own moment.


Art Since 1960 traces further artistic developments of the 1970s, from the paired-down geometry of Minimalist artists like Gene Davis, to the innovations of land artist Robert Smithson (best known for his monumental Spiral Jetty in Utah's Great Salt Lake). The exhibition continues into the present, showcasing recent trends in contemporary art, including the return to abstraction in the work of Gerhard Richter, as well as new trends in photography.


“The UMFA is thrilled to see the return of twentieth and twenty-first century art to our galleries,” states Jill Dawsey, UMFA Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art. “Viewers will encounter crucial works of the recent past, as well as the most innovative, representative examples of work being created in the present. This presentation reaffirms the UMFA's commitment to collecting and exhibiting the finest work of our own era.”


Visitors to Art Since 1960 will have the opportunity to experience some of the most inventive and exciting works that the UMFA has to offer. The installation provides a chance to follow 23 influential artists in their explorations of new media and quests for new means of expression. Visitors will encounter vivid artistic responses to the most pressing concerns of recent history and today, from questions of consumerism and technology, to multi-culturalism and the environment, to war and peace.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA’s mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world’s cultures. General admission is $5 adults, $3 seniors and youth ages 6-18, children 5 and under free, UMFA Members free. ***Admission prices are subject to change; please check our website for the most current price listings.  General admission is free to the public the first Wednesday and third Saturday of every month.  Museum hours are Tuesday – Friday: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10  a.m. – 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.; closed Mondays.  For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit  HYPERLINK "http://www.umfa.utah.edu" www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

Brian Kershisnik’s Nativity on view at the UMFA

Artist to give lecture December 6th at 2 pm

 

Salt Lake City, UT-This holiday season, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts is pleased to present Nativity, a popular painting by acclaimed Utah artist Brian Kershisnik. From December 3, 2008 – January 2, 2009 Nativity will adorn the Highlights Wall in the UMFA’s main lobby.

 

Measuring more than 7 feet high and 17 feet wide, the large-scale work depicts an intimate religious scene. A host of sparkling angels crowd the sweeping canvas, displaying a range of emotions as they gather around Mary, Joseph and the newly born baby Jesus. Several of the angels cast their gazes toward the viewer, inviting the spectator to witness the holy moment among them.

 

“Brian Kershisnik’s Nativity is an epic painting on many levels,” says UMFA Curator Donna Poutlon. “The ambitious interpretation of a family with a newborn child, the poignant narrative of the day that Christ was born, and the extraordinary specter of spirits, young and old that share in the presence of the miracle. The mural’s large scale narrowly contains the enormity of the event and the range of emotion that it evokes.”

 

Kershisnik is known for his ability to put abstract qualities of human life on canvas. Rich in color and distinctive in texture, his work often focuses on depictions of self, family and relationships. Kershisnik has earned a nationwide following for his moving and metaphoric paintings of people in moments of quiet transcendence.


PUBLIC PROGRAMMING

In conjunction with the display of Nativity, artist Brian Kershisnik will present a free public lecture on Saturday, December 6th at 2 pm in the UMFA Dumke Auditorium. A question and answer session will follow.


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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive.  Admission is $5 adults, $3 seniors and youth ages 6-18, free for children 5 and under, University of Utah students, faculty, staff and UMFA Members. Free admission offered the first Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tue – Fri 10 am – 5 pm, Wed 10 am – 8 pm, Weekends 11 am – 5 pm; closed Mondays and Holidays.  For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

The Later Works of William Utermohlen

November 1, 2008 - January 11, 2009

 

Salt Lake City, UT–The Utah Museum of Fine Arts and the Brain Institute at the University of Utah are proud to present The Later Works of William Utermohlen, a powerful art exhibition that chronicles an artist’s personal experience with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Opening November 1st to coincide with National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month, the exhibition traces Utermohlen’s courageous battle with the disease through a series of self-portraits, created from his diagnosis in 1995 until the year 2000 when he could no longer paint. Visitors to the Later Works exhibition, on view through January 11, 2009, will explore Utermohlen’s fascinating artwork and learn more about Alzheimer’s disease.

Artist History: Born December 4, 1933 to a German immigrant family in South Philadelphia, William Utermohlen spent most of his life and artistic career in London with his wife and art historian Patricia Utermohlen. A talented draftsman, Utermohlen placed a particular focus on the psychological and spatial aspects of his work. He createdseveral major cycles of paintings throughout his career, including the Dante cycle (1964-1966), Mummers Parade cycle (1969-1970) and The Conversation Pieces (1990 – 1991).

Utermohlen, Art and Alzheimer’s: William Utermohlen was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 1995. Although devastated by the news of his inevitable psychological decline, Utermohlen was determined and encouraged by medical personnel to continue creating art.

The result was a compelling collection of colorful, expressive self-portraits created over a six-year period. The Later Works of William Utermohlen document the artist’s descent into dementia and speak to his courageous attempt to maintain a sense of identity and stay connected to the world around him. Resignation, depression, frustration and bewilderment echo through his thick brushstrokes and bold color; the last portraits visually narrate the feebleness of his condition with basic forms and skewed space. Although lacking his previous artistic skill, these portraits are underlined by his devotion to draftsmanship and focus on the psyche, creating cohesive works that communicate his current state and sense of self. Even in his darkest hour when he had lost all other forms of communication, Utermohlen remained closely linked to the part of himself that most distinctly expressed who he was- an artist.

Utermohlen was lovingly cared for at his London home by his wife, friends and caregivers until 2004, when his condition made his admittance to the Princess Louise Nursing Home necessary. He died in Hammersmith Hospital in London on March 21, 2007. Today, his Later Works exist as a group of important medical and artistic documents that attest to his artistic bravery and visually describe the effects of Alzheimer’s on the brain.

Information on Alzheimer’s disease: Every 71 seconds, someone joins the ranks of an estimated 5.2 million people with Alzheimer’s disease in the United States. Over 30,000 people suffer from Alzheimer’s in the state of Utah alone. According to the Alzheimer’s Association of Utah, the Alzheimer’s epidemic is expected to reach the overwhelming
proportion of 7.7 million patients in the United States by 2030.

Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive and fatal brain disorder that destroys brain cells, affecting memory, behavior, and the thought process. There is no current cure, but an accelerating worldwide effort to treat, delay, and prevent the disorder is underway. Through The Later Works of William Utermohlen, we hope to raise awareness about the disease, gain support for finding a cure, provide resources to caregivers and patients, and explore the creative spirit apparent in many people suffering from Alzheimer’s.

PUBLIC PROGRAMMING
In collaboration with The Brain Institute and University of Utah Clinical Neurosciences Center, the UMFA is offering a FREE companion programming series.

Art and The Brain Symposium: Awakening Awareness through Art
November 8 from 10 am – 12 pm at the UMFA, light breakfast from 9 – 10 am

Join us for a FREE Art and the Brain Symposium at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts. The symposium will be led by Norman Foster, MD, Director of the Center for Alzheimer’s Care, Imaging and Research. Symposium events include:

Dancers Erik Stern, MFA, and Sarah Donohue, MFA, will perform an excerpt from Demolition Derby: When a Mind Loses Its License to Drive

Lecture by Professor Kenneth Rockwood, MD, on his unique artist-in-residence program at a Memory Disability Clinic in Halifax, Canada

Lecture by Joseph Diaz, MD, of the Brain Builders Alzheimer’s Research Program at LDS Hospital on how Alzheimer’s patients see and communicate their place in the world, highlighting Utermohlen’s artwork.


Alzheimer’s Film and Discussion Series
6 pm at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts
November 5: The Forgetting: A Portrait of Alzheimer’s
November 12: Away from Her
December 3: Complaints of a Dutiful Daughter
December 10: Quick Brown Fox

The exhibition and symposium are generously sponsored by The University of Utah Brain Institute, The University of Utah Clinical Neuroscience Center, Intermountain LDS Hospital, Dr. Julie Korenberg, Dr. Stefan Pulst, and J. Robert Stewart in memory of Anne K. Stewart.

The exhibition and symposium are generously sponsored by The University of Utah Brain Institute, The University of Utah Clinical Neuroscience Center, Intermountain LDS Hospital, Dr. Julie Korenberg, Dr. Stefan Pulst, and J. Robert Stewart in memory of Ann K. Stewart.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA's mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world's cultures. Admission is $5 adults, $3 seniors and youth ages 6-18, children 5 and under free, UMFA Members free. Free admission offered on the fi rst Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Museum hours are Tuesday – Friday: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

 

Changing Identity: Recent Works by Women Artists from Vietnam

October 17, 2008-December 28, 2009

 

Salt Lake City, UT – The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is pleased to present Changing Identity:Recent Works by Women Artists from Vietnam, the first major exhibition of contemporary Vietnamese women artists in the United States, on view October 17, 2008 to December 28, 2009.

 

Changing Identity affords visitors the opportunity to see Vietnam through the eyes of ten contemporary women artists who have a particular perspective about their homeland and themselves. Not only does it bring to light a viewpoint marginalized in Vietnamese culture, but it does so from the perspective of the women themselves, who have been virtually overlooked by the international art world.


For the past two decades, since Vietnam opened its doors to the West, a booming fine arts community has brought economic prosperity to many of the country’s artists.  Although most of this success has been bestowed on male artists, female artists have found themselves in a position to critique the prevailing norms and to question the status quo. The historical legacy of war left an older generation of women battered and cynical, but the era of globalization and sweeping economic changes in Vietnam have allowed a younger generation of professional women to look optimistically toward a future as successful wage earners and social leaders.  These young women are independent and complex and their outlook on Vietnamese society is challenging and honest.


“As a window into the lively contemporary art scene in Vietnam, the Changing Identity exhibition provides a fascinating new perspective on a Vietnam that is changing and globalizing in surprising ways and at a rapid pace,” states Professor Janet Theiss, Director of Asian Studies at the University of Utah. “The exhibit highlights the complexities of women’s place in contemporary Vietnamese society and their unique artistic perspectives on themselves and their history.”


In the words of filmmaker and scholar Trinh T. Minh-ha, to be a woman, an artist and Vietnamese is a “triple bind.” The term “woman” is imbedded with a familiar set of stereotypes and representations, and if you add to that being an artist, a woman’s identity becomes more obscured and complex. Further still, the title “Vietnamese” binds these women to a Western perception as victims of war and the male gaze, made familiar with such icons as Miss Saigon. As Trinh T. Minh-Ha explains, these women are not only fastened to stereotypes in the West, but are also bound by images and traditions within their own country and culture. Women in Vietnam are often expected to remain devoted to their fathers, husbands and sons, and required to function modestly within a masculine socialist system.  These cultural “binds” and stereotypes have left many Vietnamese women to search for a balance between tradition and modernity.


The works in Changing Identity may compel viewers to reflect on this idea of a “triple bind,” but do not offer a definitive portrait of what it means to combine the terms: Art, Women, and Vietnamese. Rather, this exhibition invites viewers to contemplate a variety of images deriving from both older and younger generations of female Vietnamese artists, to understand these women in their historical and social context, and to recognize the ten particular experiences and individual opinions represented. The mediums and themes in Changing Identity are as diverse as each featured artist, but all 50 works speak out to boldly express the beliefs and ideas these women hold about themselves, their country, and their changing identity.


Changing Identity is toured and organized by International Arts & Artists, Washington, DC, and supported in part by the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation and the Henry Luce Foundation.  Educational activities made possible by a grant from the Ford Foundation, Hanoi office, and fiscally administered by the Institute of International Education.


Free Public Programming  

Third Saturday: Masks
Saturday, October 18 • 2 – 4 pm

Children and families are invited to explore their own changing identities! Look for the many different textures, subjects and ideas from the traveling exhibition Changing Identity: Recent Works by Women Artists from Vietnam and then design and paint papier maché masks. No RSVP required.


Changing Identity Film Series

Wednesday, October 22 • 6 pm: When The Tenth Month Comes

Saturday, November 8 • 2 – 4 pm: Nostalgia for Countryside

Saturday, November 22 • 2 – 4pm: The Vertical Ray of the Sun


Presentation by Dinh Y Nhi: Changing Identity Exhibition

Tuesday, October 28, • 1 – 2 pm

Join us as we welcome Vietnamese artist Dinh Y Nhi and exhibition curator Nora Taylor to the UMFA for a presentation about Nhi’s art in the Changing Identity exhibition. In her new series entitled "The Secret World of Dinh Y Nhi" the artist looks deeply into her own soul and spirit as a mother, daughter, and woman in today's Vietnam.


Lecture: Gender and the Cultural Politics of Memory in Vietnam

Wednesday, November 5 • 1 pm

In conjunction with the Changing Identity exhibition and the Asian Studies Department, the UMFA is hosting a lecture by Christina Schwenkel, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Riverside. She will speak on Gender and the Cultural Politics of Memory in Vietnam.

 

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The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is located on the University of Utah campus at 410 Campus Center Drive. The UMFA’s mission is to engage visitors in discovering meaningful connections with the artistic expressions of the world’s cultures. Admission is $5 adults, $3 seniors and youth ages 6-18, children 5 and under free, UMFA Members free. General admission is free to the public the first Wednesday of every month.  Museum hours are Tuesday – Friday: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Wednesdays 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.; Weekends, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.; closed Mondays.  For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu.

 

Monet to Picasso

From the Cleveland Museum of Art

June 23-September 21, 2008

 

Salt Lake City, UT - This summer the Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) will present the highly
acclaimed exhibition Monet to Picasso from the Cleveland Museum of Art. The show features 100 years of European masterworks and the UMFA is privileged to be among only four North American venues selected to host this marquee international touring exhibition. The works on display in this show have never been to Utah before.


Opening its three-month run at the UMFA on June 23, 2008, Monet to Picasso will feature works by the leading artists of the European Modernist movements, dating from 1864 to 1964. More than seventy paintings and sculptures by luminaries of Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Cubism, and Surrealism are gathered together in this singular exhibition. Most notably, the exhibition includes key works by Gustave Courbet, Pierre August Renoir, Edgar Degas, Edouard Manet, Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, Paul Cézanne, Pierre Bonnard, Auguste Rodin, Pablo Picasso, Amedeo Modigliani, Henri Matisse, Rene Magritte, Georges Braque, Max Ernst, Piet Mondrian, Henry Moore, and Salvador Dalí.


"This exhibition is a unique and tremendously exciting opportunity for all art-lovers living in the region," said Gretchen Dietrich, UMFA director of public programs and curatorial affairs. "The works of art that comprise the exhibition are by some of the world's most loved artists and together, they tell the fascinating story of the European Modernism development from the mid-nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. We are proud to be hosting an exhibition of this caliber and confident that all those who come to see the exhibition and participate in the public programming that we have organized to complement it, will have a memorable and thrilling experience."


The works in Monet to Picasso reveal a period of artistic innovation that profoundly changed the course of European art. Visitors to this extraordinary exhibition will have the rare opportunity to see a remarkable gathering of work by some of the most important modern masters of the last two centuries.


This exhibition has been organized by the Cleveland Museum of Art.

 

 

 





 

  
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